The Plan is Always to Improvise

A Random Fandom Update, because I have time. This month’s schedule for me is nuts, so lots of things are getting done today.

So, the reboot of MacGyver has come to a conclusion; it was announced only a few weeks ago, after the season finale had been finished.  I had mixed emotions going into the finale.  I figured it wouldn’t be as heart-wrenching as the finale of Supernatural; it’s not that kind of show.  And honestly, the last couple seasons have been disappointing in my opinion.  [Warning: There Be Spoilers Ahead]  I was sad to see Jack leave the show and even more sad when they officially killed him off this season; more due to the affect it would have on Mac (and Lucas Till played that end scene brilliantly…when you want to give a character a hug…).  I was initially intrigued by bringing on Desi, because she is a kick-butt women and we need more women like her.  But this past season especially, the show began to revolve around a love triangle between Mac, Riley, and Desi.  That is not why I tune in to the show; I want Mac to use his Swiss Army knife to save the day.  I don’t care about whether his relationship with Desi will last.  Because that is a disservice to the female characters, to reduce them to their interaction with male characters and the only way they can be important to the story is to be in love with the lead man.

And these secret societies bad guys; there’s no substance to them.  Admit it, we kind of like Murdoc because you never know what crazy thing he will do next.  But “who is behind the curtain?” gets annoying after a few episodes.  And the ending [Spoiler Alert] that this past season was all the U.S. government’s fault?  Does not sit well.  I don’t know if they’re trying to make a statement, but “the government is out to get you,” is not comforting.  I liked the notion of the Phoenix Foundation splitting and going completely private to be great.  Would have made an interesting season and I’m not opposed if they decide to bring it back; on the other hand, it gives fanfiction authors lots of avenues to explore.  And while I enjoy seeing the lead characters in a little peril, I prefer the “we have to run away from this explosion,” or “let’s not get shot,” kind of suspense.  Not suffocating in a tube.

Will I complete the series on DVD, yes.  And yes, I like DVDs entertainment companies because what if your Internet connection is spotty?  But I will also continue to explore MacGyver fanfiction stories.

Some fanfic author recommendations, all excellent, go check them out!

Ridley C. James

objessions

Gib

The Girl Who Remembers

Sabby Starlight

helloyesimhere

gaelicspirit (excellent author in general)

katitkat

(I also have my own headcannon and storyline written for Mac if anyone is ever interested)

“Maybe we could get back to saving the day”

Season Four

The Library and its Librarians has survived the ultimate battle against Apep.  Now, they’re past the point of prophecy; anything could happen.  Like odd priests (led by John Noble, best known as Denethor) uncovering large stones in Dark Secret.  These turn out to be the original cornerstones of the Library of Alexandria.  Flynn and Eve are practicing a bonding ceremony, led by Jenkins; they will tether the Library to this world and also gain immortality.  An alarm warns them of the cornerstones and Jenkins leads them to a cell beneath the Library, holding Nicole Noone; Flynn’s Guardian from  Quest of the Spear.  Turns out, they she got thrown back in time during that mission at the end of the film and at some point along the way, gained immortality herself.  Jenkins [rightly] does not trust her, but Flynn wants to speak to her alone.  She tries to get Flynn to doubt the Library; it’s keeping him prisoner.

In the meantime, the other Librarians track down the cornerstones before the Heretic Church of Shadows can plunge the world into another Dark Age.  Stone is excited to visit the Paris Opera House and a brief shout out to Phantom of the Opera.  But, they lose the stone and the Shadows try to bring the Library back to this world in order to destroy it.  Nicole ends up helping out and Flynn has to save her.  But she disappears at the end.

In Steal of Fortune, one of Jake’s friends gets a bad string of luck at a horse track.  Actually, a lot of people have been experiencing bad luck.  The Librarians figure out it is the statue of “Lady Luck” come to life.  They manage to rig the casino and she begins to lose her powers and revert back to a statue.  We meet Ezekiel Jones’ family in Christmas Thief.  They had no clue he was a world-class thief.  He accidentally shows his mother the Annex and the Magic Door globe, which she uses to rob the Bank of Thieves.  Ezekiel gets found out and they’re about to be terminated; for it is run by the patron saint of thieves, who happens to be Santa’s brother.  Yes, Santa has entrusted the three Librarians to guard his sleigh, which of course, they take out for a spin. Christmas is almost ruined, but Jenkins saves the day.  And Ezekiel reveals that he would steal things so he could donate the profits; roads, schools, and hospitals got built.  It is far better to give, than to receive.

Silver Screen is rather fun; Flynn and Eve go on a date to see one of her favorite black-and-white detective films.  And end up sucked in.  They have to play out the rest of the story in order to leave; and it’s a bit hilarious at times, and they enjoy themselves.  But the film does not end the way Eve remembers.  Jenkins tracks down the solution; the writer’s secretary had written the story in order to reveal her own daughter, but it got covered up (mother and daughter are reunited in the end).  And the other three Librarians travel through other films (Stone gets to sing, and then they end up in space).

A town turns old in Bleeding Crown and a former Librarian jumps through time to help.  Flynn fanboys for a bit over Darrington Dare, which is rather sweet.  But Darrington warns Flynn that the Library can only have one Librarian; more than one and the in-fighting will destroy the Library.  And say hello to Porthos again (Howard Charles); he plays the villainous wizard .  Their relationship apparently inspired Holmes and Moriaty; they are nemesis, and the only people in each others’ lives.  The wizard is attempting to create clones, but they age really quick, so he plans to steal the souls of others to stabilize his creations.  Darrington is willing to let the other Librarians die, but Flynn will not.  They are his friends and just as important as the Library.  And his talk to Darrington actually influenced Darrington’s life; he was fated to die the day he returned to the past, but they discover that he changed his ways and lived a longer, fuller life.  But he still warns Flynn there can only be one Librarian.

Eve meets up with Nicole in Graves of Time; she wants to help a fellow Guardian.  Nicole has been using her graves (she faked her death every twenty years to avoid suspicion) to hide an artifact.  Flynn and Jenkins follow them; Jenkins still does not trust Nicole.  Eve and Jenkins get captured by the old man [if he looks familiar, he’s played by Christopher Heyerdahl {Thor Heyerdahl was his father’s cousin; blame my brother for me recognizing the surname} and he’s appeared in Scorpion, MacGyver, Castle.  He’s Marcus in Twilight and oh yeah, Alastair in Supernatural] following Nicole, who claims that Nicole was a follower of Rasputin and caused the downfall of the Romanov family.  Actually, he was Rasputin and immortal.  He stabs Nicole, but Flynn feeds Rasputin radiation in order to kill him.  Jenkins believes that Nicole was protecting the Library, so he siphons off his immortality to save her.  Sadly, the episode ends with Flynn gone and his tethering ring left behind.  Jenkins feels Flynn has resigned and now the fate of the Library is in question.

The team finds a mystery in Disenchanted Forest; people have been disappearing.  The neighboring team-building camp plans to expand and this forest is connected to all other forests.  It finds its mouthpiece through Jacob.  DOSA even agrees to help protect the land, granting it “Area 51 Status.”  Jacob had also befriended a reporter who got fired for writing about magic and the Library.  So she doesn’t feel like a complete lunatic, Jacob shows her the Library, but she cannot reveal the secret and Jacob cannot be with her.  In Hidden Sanctuary, Cassandra leaves the Library for the safest town in America; she froze during a recent mission and it’s been haunting her.  So now, she wants a safe life without people depending on her.  And she enjoys her life, but she also uncovers a mystery.  The town councilman had once made a wish after saving a fairy that no one would have accidents again.  Cassandra’s arrival through the Magic Door weakened the spell containing the fairy, but she talks the fairy down, with some help, from wreaking vengeance upon the town.  Cassandra luckily returns to the Library.

Town Called Feud hosts a Civil War reenactment, focused on brothers who served on both sides, then ended up killing each other.  During this year’s event, a ghost appears and says “the brothers are rising.”  Cassandra stays back with Jenkins, to have high tea and some research (it’s rather adorable), so Eve takes Jake and Ezekiel to investigate.  A locket played into the legend, supposedly broken and will now be attached.  Jake and Ezekiel start arguing, like brothers do; there’s also the underlying tension that one of the three remaining Librarians will need to tether to Eve to protect the Library.  The two brothers’ ghosts indeed rise, as do their armies, and take over the town.  Jack and Ezekiel aim guns at each other, but miss.  As do the armies.  Turns out, the brothers had reconciled on the battlefield, to protect their families.  “The world needs brothers being brothers.”

Jenkins faces his own trials with Some Dude Named Jeff.  Jeff bought a grimoire online and used a spell to trade places with Jenkins.  He and his friends play a D&D campaign as the Librarians and Jeff wanted to have a cool life.  So Jenkins must get out of Jeff’s body and back into the Library.  He reluctantly recruits Jeff’s friends to get him in the back door.  The other Librarians eventually figure out that Jeff is not Jenkins, but before they could do anything, the grimoire released Asmodeus [yep, character appeared in Supernatural as well, a prince of Hell].  Jeff and Jenkins battle side-by-side and trap the prince again.  And Jenkins has gained some new friends, who are very interested in his tales of Arthur’s Court.  As long as he gets to be the dungeon master do they do it right.  A fairly light-hearted episode.  Which is good because…

Events begin to come to a head in Trial of the One.  The Library is reverting to protecting only its artifacts, since Eve has not chosen a Librarian to tether with.  It takes over Jenkins and has the three Librarians fight to the death to decide who will tether.  Eve fights back and brings the Librarians together again, but Jenkins is mortally wounded.  The three Librarians all resign over Jenkins’ death.  Stone no longer trusts the Library; for Ezekiel, the Library crossed a line; and Cassandra hates the Library now.  Nicole pops in and circles a grieving Eve.  This was all Nicole’s plan (we knew Jenkins was right not to trust her) to destroy the Library.  She feels the Library betrayed her.  The Library fades around Eve.  She arrives in a black and white world in Echoes of Memory.  She uses the memory palace technique to focus on specific aspects of the Library to keep it in tact; the Spear of Destiny, the Ark of the Covenant, and the lion statues.  Flynn’s tethering ring gives her a clue and she stumbles across a recorded message from Flynn.  He did not leave the Library of his own violation; Nicole kidnapped him.  Flynn loves Eve and was ready to tether.  But now Eve has to find Flynn; and the other Librarians.

This world is run by “the Company” [and reminds me a lot of 1984; I hated that book] and everything is blah.  No one seeks knowledge.  Eve finds Jake selling beige cars, but sparks his memory of the Library.  They find Cassandra next, still working complex math problems.  Ezekiel runs the only show in town, but still likes to pick locks.  Eve is captured by Nicole and put in a mental hospital, where everyone else who questions things is put.  Eve finds Flynn who has held on to his own memories, despite several attempts by Nicole to wipe his mind.  She’s trying to hang on to the man she had fallen in love with and had hoped for centuries would rescue her.  Eve finds Flynn and they share a kiss.  Eve remembers the Library now and Flynn vows to never leave her or the Library ever again.  And she still loves this nice, cute, and completely crazy man.

The other three begin to remember their gifts and mount a rescue for Eve and Flynn.  They’re soon trapped however, but Eve encourages them to manifest the Library where they stand.  It’s full of art, science, and magic and it values each Librarian.  It lives in each of them and Flynn is the heart and soul of the Library.  Nicole can only watch as the Library returns and her plan fails.  While our heroes are back in the Library, Jenkins is still dead.  But Flynn won’t give up; he has a crazy idea to rewrite history just enough.  He jumps through a portal to the moment when Nicole will take the immortality potion and he begs her to help the Library.  He cannot rescue her, but she is still the Library’s Guardian.  She agrees and Flynn wakes up back at the tethering ceremony rehearsal, from the beginning of the season.  He re-wrote everything that happened.  Eve remembers, but the other three don’t.  The couple asks Jenkins (who is alive, huzzah!) to perform the ceremony now, don’t wait for the solstice.

I’m glad things worked out alright, but I’m not fond of the Nicole plot.  I wasn’t terribly fond of her in Spear of Destiny because she was often dismissive of Flynn.  This season was a bit of a letdown after the previous season.  I know there was no big bad to defeat, but there are plenty more stories and artifacts to explore.  This felt a bit like a cop-out.

There have been a few tie-in novels published: The Lost Lamp, The Mother Goose Case, and The Pot of Gold.  I recommend them all!

And of course, there is some rather good fanfiction stories out there.

Check out Hedgehog-O-Brien on AO3 for some trio Librarian fluff.

And icarus_chained weaves in some mythology and introspection on Jenkins.

Up Next: Air Force One

Time Travel Gives You a Headache

Season Two

Drowned Book starts with a flashback to the beginning of season one, when magic surges back through the ley lines.  An older man summons a character from Sherlock Holmes; “I have need of your genius, sir.”  Fast forward to present day, everyone ends up invited to the same New York museum, but on different cases.  Eve suggests working together, but they’ve all gotten used to doing their own thing.  A strange storm blows in and Eve and Flynn meet James Worth (played by the dashing David S. Lee; he’s been in episodes of Castle, NCIS and NCIS:LA), head of antiquities from Oxford.  James charms Eve and can match Flynn for deducting.  The three younger Librarians end up teaming up again to solve their problems and Flynn realizes that Worth is a fictional.  His first guess is Sherlock Holmes (and he’s ever so excited), but Worth is actually Moriarty.  But he’s not the true mastermind connecting all the artifacts.  That would be Prospero, Shakespeare’s wizard from The Tempest.  Prospero is a Fictional so powerful, he rose from his own tale.  But he wants to control his own story, not be bound by what Shakespeare wrote.  He and Moriarty manage to disappear, but the Librarians have to deal with the storm that is spiraling out of control.  They end up using a sun from the Library to burn off the cold air and save New York.  Flynn sulks that he liked being able to do things his way, but Eve points out that pooling information works just as well.

In Broken Staff, Flynn and Eve follow up clues to keep Prospero from regaining more of his power, while Prospero and Moriarty manage to make it into the Library.  They hold Jenkins hostage for a bit, asking about the Heart of the Library, the Tree of Knowledge.  Again, it takes all of the Librarians, including Flynn and Eve to defeat the traps Prospero has laid.  Flynn burns a Tree to thwart Prospero (not actually the Tree of Knowledge, he hopes it wasn’t important).  But the Library has also been re-arranging itself and sixteen artifacts are missing.  Eve again suggests that Flynn carry on searching for the artifacts alone while she helps the other three Librarians settle the Library.

The three younger Librarians head to Jacob’s home state to solve a rift in the Earth in What Lies Beneath the Stone.  Jacob’s not thrilled about returning home; he kept his academic life very secret at home and he’s been saying “family ain’t easy” for a while.  He has strong disagreements with his father, but the Librarian job is more important.  They pass Ezekiel off as the expert since Stone’s father is dismissive of him and eventually work out that it’s a Native American trickster who has been set free and causing chaos; feeding off lies.  It looks like Jacob reconciles with his father for a moment, but it was the shapeshifter.  Jacob fights him off and locks him away again.  He still does not tell his father the truth, because he has realized that he doesn’t need his father’s approval.  So he signs his own name to the academic paper he is writing.  The team heads to Wexler University in Cost of Education, where people are strangely disappearing.  Cassandra meets another girl who is tracking magic and linking it with science.  A tentacle monster from another dimension is stealing people who are full of ego.  Cassandra follows her new friend into the wormhole to rescue her, but is stopped for a brief moment by the ladies of the Lake Foundation, interested in combining science and math.  Cassandra is content with being a Librarian, but the invitation stands.  She disagrees with Jenkins on whether magic should be studied or not.  Ezekiel sadly loses his new gargoyle friend, Stumpy.

In Hollow Men, Flynn pops back in to find the Eye of Zarathustra, which “is the key to the door of Lost Knowledge, the Staff summoned by Sun and Rue.”  But he’s quickly separated from the rest of the Librarians, held by a strange man who somehow knows Flynn, but not really.  Prospero is also after the staff and Moriarty still flirts with Eve.  She ends up having to team up with the antagonist in order to find Flynn.  And it turns out, Flynn is traveling with the intelligence of the Library.  Meanwhile, the other three work with Jenkins to keep the Library from completely dying.  Ray regains his memories, though Moriarty has to take the staff to save him. The Library is wholly restored.  Baird visits an old friend in Infernal Contract; Sam Denning (Michael Trucco, he’s appeared in several TV shows, including Castle as a similarly named Detective Tom Demming that was interested in Kate) is running for mayor in a small town.  But turns out that his opponent’s family has had a long running deal with a devil (played by John de Lancie, a few episodes of Charmed and Stargate SG-1, and Q in Star Trek); a bit like crossroad demons in Supernatural.  Eve, Jenkins, and the Librarians manage to trick the devil and rescue Sam and the town.  Jenkins sweetly takes care of the three ill Librarians at the end and points out that Eve’s job as Guardian is to save the Librarians’ souls.

The team gets to go clubbing in London in Image of Image, trying to figure out how people are mysteriously dying from something they weren’t doing.  They’re all connected to Club Effigy, where pictures mark them as the next victim.  There’s a charming Englishman who turns out to be Dorian Gray.  Any of his vices are passed onto his victims, keeping him young and beautiful.  Until Ezekiel and Cassandra turn the tables on him.  Jenkins once again counsels Eve on the upcoming battle between good and evil.  Jenkins goes to a Fae for information on Prospero at the beginning of Point of Salvation.  The rest of the team gets stuck in a video game scenario at a DARPA lab.  Ezekiel is the only one who remembers each pass and gets tired of seeing his friends die.  He forces them to believe him and follow him, even sacrificing himself at the end.  Jacob and Cassandra figure out a way to bring him back and now he doesn’t remember his heroic deeds [or does he?].  Prospero attacks in the final moments.  He created a spell that wiped the memory of Eve, Cassandra, Ezekiel, and Jacob from Jenkins’ mind in Happily Ever After.  Flynn heads off to find them and discovers they’re leading new, but similar lives together on a small island.  Eve is the sheriff, dating Moriarty.  Cassandra has been to the moon, Jacob teaches eleven different classes at the university, and Ezekiel is an FBI agent, but their home base seems to resemble a library.  Flynn teams up with the sprite, Ariel [she is adorable] to bring his family’s memories back.  Eve has to do the same for Flynn at the end because his perfect life is one puzzle after another that he solves by himself.  But they’ve been under the spell for three weeks, Jenkins reports.  The ley lines have been supercharged by Prospero; it means the end of the world.

A giant forest begins to cover the earth in Final Curtain.  Due to a wet hand, Flynn and Eve finally realize the strange note they found in John Dee’s estate in Drowned Book was written by Flynn in his left hand.  They use time travel to go back to when Shakespeare wrote The Tempest, but it breaks upon their departure.  Now Jenkins and the other three Librarians have to follow the rest of the clues to stop Prospero in the present.  Prospero has one final task for Moriarty and sends him back in time as well.  But Moriarty wants vengeance on his taskmaster for holding him prisoner and decides the best way to do that is to try to kill Shakespeare.  Obviously, that does not work out, but Flynn and Eve discover that Prospero is Shakespeare transformed.  His quill is magical, part of the Tree of Knowledge gifted to him by John Dee.  With it, Shakespeare transforms into the wizard so he can escape a failure in his career.  Moriarty is swiftly dealt with by Prospero, and he almost drowns Eve.  She rises out of the water, like the Lady of the Lake (aided by the ladies of the Lake), throwing Excalibur to Flynn to defeat Prospero.  So it follows that old adage of King Arthur, that he who wields Excalibur will do so once more and save England.  The other three turn Prospero back into Shakespeare in the present, using some of Shakespeare’s’ work to define themselves.  A portal opens that can send Shakespeare back to his time, but Flynn and Eve cannot come forward.  However, they figure out how to do time travel the long way round, leaving the notes they need for themselves and asking Shakespeare to use his magic quill one last time to make them into a statue that is delivered to the Library for safekeeping.  The other three free them from their very long kiss and heck, even Cal is back.

It’s adorable how much this team continues to become a family.  Since I am not fully versed in Shakespeare, I probably miss some of the nuisances of Prospero being the villain, but Moriarty is excellent; almost sympathetic at times.  I’m glad that Flynn takes Eve with him to defeat Prospero, rather than leaving her behind and handling the mission on his own; and I’m even happier that they don’t stay stuck in Elizabethan England forever.

Next Time: Season Three

Offering You the Chance to Save the World, Twice Before Friday

Season One

Flynn Carson is back, still protecting the world from dangerous magical artifacts (Noah Wyle is billed as “special guest star” since he couldn’t star in two television shows at the same time).  He’s been doing the job, alone, for eleven years.  Though it turns out that the Library wants to add to the team.  It recruits Colonel Eve Baird (played by Rebecca Romijn, who was Mystique/Raven in the 2000’s X-Men trilogy), head of a NATO terrorist task force, to become Flynn’s Guardian.  As Charlene points out, Flynn hasn’t had a proper Guardian since Nicole (in the first movie).  We also find out that Judson passed away five years previous, though his spirit still speaks to Flynn in a mirror (and Flynn’s mother apparently had passed as well).

In The Crown of King Arthur, Eve helps Flynn solve the mystery of why experts are being killed; one professor had been trying to reach Flynn regarding a painting.  The connection?  He had been invited to interview at the Library the same day Flynn was hired; the professor was only a few people behind Flynn.  There are a few top candidates left alive.  Cassandra Cillian (played by Lindy Booth who has starred in a few Hallmark movies, including playing a librarian falling in back in love with a football star) is startlingly brilliant with math and science, but they sometimes get cross-wired with her other senses and a brain tumor pushes her death sooner rather than later.  Ezekiel Jones (John Harlan Kim, he has appeared in a few episodes of NCIS: LA and Hawaii Five-0) is a master thief, and Jacob Stone (Christian Kane, previously starred in Leverage, and I absolutely loved his appearance as an old friend of Dean’s in Supernatural; complete with singing Good Ol’ Boys [one of my favorite scenes of the entire show]) is a genius art historian who hides out in his hometown.  Yes, apparently ninjas do pop up in Oklahoma, sent by the Serpent Brotherhood. 

Eve and Flynn bring the other three to the Library to keep them safe.  One of them excitedly asks if vampires are real.  Flynn answers yes to vampires, no to Dracula, because he killed him (call back to the third movie).  Cassandra is glad to have lived long enough to find out magic is real, but Jacob wants to know why no one sees is.  Response: it’s buried in ley lines.  Long ago, the world was filled with magic, but it was drained off and stored in artifacts; which is why the Librarian travels the world to collect the artifacts and house them safely in the Library.  As technology has risen, magic has faded away.  Stone helps solve the mystery of the painting; it’s The Crown of King Arthur.  The actual crown was apparently created by Merlin to allow Arthur to control the magic of Camelot in order to rule.  Hence why the Serpent Brotherhood wants it; they want to release wild magic back into the world and create chaos; that they will rule.

Flynn catches up to Eve and the trio in Munich.  The painting supports the Roman hypothesis of Arthur [we’ve seen that in a few of the prior Arthurian legend movies], but the painting is actually a fake, Stone points out.  They quickly discover that the museum was built around the painting; it’s a clue (after arguing for a bit, it’s like the inside of Flynn’s mind has spilled out, but louder).  It leads outside to a sundial, which leads to a henge in the German forest.  All the while, trying to keep ahead of the Brotherhood, led by Lamia, a skilled female fighter.  The good guys recover the crown with a bit of shenanigans. 

Flynn intends to send the three newcomers home, but an alarm is set off.  The Serpent Brotherhood has gotten inside the Library.  But with the security upgrade, someone would have had to let them in.  Sadly, it was Cassandra.  The Brotherhood promised her magic would cure her brain tumor.  Lamia gains the crown and calls Excalibur to her, though Flynn puts up a fight.  He’s stabbed with Excalibur, and even though he takes a healing tonic, it cannot cure wounds dealt by a magical weapon.  Flynn will die.

The adventure immediately picks up in Sword in the Stone.  Judson and Charlene work together to protect the Library, meaning they lock it into its own pocket dimension.  Flynn mourns the their loss and the loss of his home.  Eve and the three men are met by an elderly gentleman who agrees to help them and takes them to the Library’s Annex.  You can still access any of the books from the Library.  Its’ caretaker is Jenkins (the veteran John Larroquette, got an early start with Black Sheep Squadron, then broke out in Night Court amongst his long career), who is eager to send them on their way so he can return to his peace and research.  Jenkins encourages Eve to help Flynn; she gives him a pep talk so he will save the world one last time.

Meanwhile, Cassandra meets, Dulaque (Matt Frewer, who provided several animated voices to various series and appeared as Pestilence in Supernatural), the leader of the Serpent Brotherhood.  Excalibur is the key to unlocking the Stone, which will release magic.  And the stone is in London.  Through a secret entrance in Buckingham Palace, the royal family has been guarding it for years.  Cassandra helps the Brotherhood, until she discovers their true purpose and is then locked up for her troubles.  She does aid her new friends; Flynn understands why she chose to initially help the Brotherhood, to save herself.  Lamia places Excalibur back in the Stone, but distractions help Flynn gain the Crown and regain Excalibur.  The Brotherhood runs off, but Flynn is still dying and now so is Excalibur.  He offers the sword to heal Cassandra, it has that much magic left.  With Judson and Charlene gone, and Cal dying, it’s Flynn’s time.  Instead, Cassandra chooses to save Flynn.

Flynn feels it is safer for the three young adults to leave, but he vows to find the Library and bring it back.  Though he begins thinking; if he’s in charge now, he can change the rules.  There can be more than one Librarian.  And they can train the Librarian instead of throwing them into sink or swim situations.  He tells everyone to open their envelopes; there are new invitations inside.  Flynn will go off by himself, he’s used to it, but Eve will stay and protect the new Librarians, with Jenkins’ help.  He’s offering them a life a mystery and misery, of loneliness and adventure.  A chance to save the world, twice before Friday.  Flynn bids farewell to Eve who makes him promise not to die, and there is a parting kiss (squee!) [And I still totally want this job!]

The new crew continues their adventures in Horns of Dilemma, where they have to solve the labyrinth of the Minotaur and recover the twine.  (Familiar face is Tricia Helfer, who has been in several Hallmark Channel movies).  And yes, Santa Claus is real (and played by Bruce Campbell, who played Sam Axe in Burn Notice) in Santa’s Midnight Run.  The Serpent Brotherhood plans to kill Santa and the Librarians must stop them.  Eve ends up taking on the role of spreading goodwill back to the human race on Christmas Eve.  She was in fact named “Eve,” for being born on that night.

Ezekiel and Jenkins have to team up and entertain a conclave of magical beings in Apple of Discord while Stone, Cassandra, Eve, and even Flynn shows up to retrieve the dragon’s pearl.  Except hidden inside the pearl is the Apple of Discord, which brings out the worst in everyone.  And Dulaque wants the conclave to vote to disband the Library.  Of course, the heroes prevail and point out that the world needs the Library to protect it from harmful artifacts.  Eve permanently transfers to the Library and sends Flynn back out to do his thing (of course, with a parting kiss).  The Librarians’ next case is the Fables of Doom, where fairytales are coming to life in a small town.  Eve does ask Ezekiel to not antagonize local law enforcement, though he argues it is fun.  An old book, the Librus Fabula brings fairytales to life, but will re-write reality and sucks life from those trapped in its stories.  The local librarian is using it on a young girl and our heroes slowly turn into archetypes: Jacob is the Huntsman, Cassandra is Prince Charming, and Eve is the Princess (their clothing and hairstyles change throughout the episode).  Ezekiel is what he always is, the Lucky Thief and he helps the girl recover and rewrite the story so the good guys win.

They encounter magic occurring at a STEM fair in Rule of Three.  Someone has created an app that doubles as a focusing spell, so when the students all imagine beating the leader, bad luck will befall them three times over.  Cassandra gets to shine by combining science and magic.  And they encounter a new foe; Morgan le Fay (played by Alicia Witt, another actress who has appeared in Hallmark Channel movies, and even an episode of Supernatural [I think I may have figured out why so many Hallmark stars are in Supernatural; they both film in Canada]).  Jenkins is furious to encounter her (she calls him Galais) and warns Eve that there is a larger battle coming.  The Librarians save the day, but hints are dropped that something bigger is coming.

Heart of Darkness reminds me of a Supernatural episode.  There is a haunted house that traps people inside.  Eve keeps trying to protect Cassandra, but it is ultimately Cassandra who faces off against Katie.  The house is actually the House of Refuge, until a family of serial killers, the Bloody Benders, moved in [yep, really sounds like a Supernatural episode].  Jacob befriends the local archivist in City of Light.  It is ultimately a town designed by Tesla, but the citizens got trapped between worlds and the streetlights are the only thing tying them to this world.  They try to recreate Tesla’s plan to bring everyone back, but Cassandra works out that too much could go wrong and harm too many people.  Mabel sacrifices herself to shut it off.  Though there is a ray of hope at the end; Jenkins has Eve write down an appointment for future Librarians, so maybe there will be a way to bring them back.

The season ends with Loom of Fate.  It begins with Flynn meeting the team at an Egyptian tomb; he has an idea on how to bring the Library back.  The team helps out with the artifacts they have recovered throughout the year.  But just when Flynn is about to succeed, Dulaque enters and kills Lamia so he can view the Loom of Fate.  Eve and Flynn jump through and Dulaque cuts the Loom at the spot where Camelot fell.  Eve and Flynn then bounce through different timelines, where Flynn did not become the Librarian.  In each case, one of the junior Librarians took the job and they all lost Eve.  In one case, it’s Jacob Stone and Eve who pair up, instead Flynn.  In Cassandra’s case, she studied under Morgan and has a few more clues.  Camelot was the height of magic and power, but with the Loom cut, time is fraying and it will require all three Librarians to get Eve and Flynn back to the Annex and then to the River of Time.  Flynn reweaves the Loom with the labyrinth twine, while Jenkins faces off against a younger Dulaque…as in Lancelot du Lac (played by Jerry O’Connell, among his many television and movie roles, he does play Sheldon’s older brother in Big Bang Theory [Rebecca Romijn’s real-life husband].  Jenkins is actually Galahad [the son of Lancelot and Elaine of Corbenic] and argues against Lancelot wanting to return to Camelot; it wasn’t as great as Lancelot remembers and mortals have earned the right to rule themselves.  Jenkins bests Lancelot and Flynn reverts to his usual self.  They have to get Eve help; Lancelot stabbed her.  But first, Flynn has to finish bringing back the Library.  The Library holds the solution for curing Eve…the same potion Flynn took in Sword in the Stone will actually work on Eve’s wound, though it’s a close thing.  Flynn refused to let Eve die like she had in all other timelines; he does not believe in Fate.  But he’s glad to be home in his Library.  They send the three young Librarians off on their own adventures, and Eve will accompany Flynn on his adventures.

I adore the show even more than I love the movies.  With a television show, there is more time to develop characters and plot lines further.  And of course, I love the integration of Arthurian legend into the story.  Cassandra is a sweetheart, Jacob is the big brother, Ezekiel is the annoying little brother, and Eve just tries to keep them all together.

Up Next: Season Two

“Carry On My Wayward Son/ There’ll Be Peace When You Are Done/ Lay Your Weary Head to Rest/ Don’t You Cry No More”

The Supernatural Series Finale

Yes, I said in the last post that I’d be taking a break for the holidays (because life gets nuts), but did you really expect that I wouldn’t say something about the end a beloved show?  The heart wrenching finale aired last night and I will mark spoilers. (And yes, I had to do that title)

I never expected to become a Supernatural fan, or part of the SPNFamily.  I did not watch it when it premiered; I probably wasn’t even aware it existed at that point.  I was still in high school; getting into Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter, so definitely into the fantasy genre, but not horror.  I don’t do horror movies.  I remember seeing the DVD covers at my cousin’s and thinking, “I will never watch that.”  (Pretty sure it was the cover with a giant snake on Sam’s arm and thinking, “that must be a bad guy”…oh how wrong was I).  I think my friend in college mentioned it and I still resisted.  At that point I watched NCIS, NCIS: Los Angeles, and Castle.  Mainstream shows.

2015 rolls around; I’m working two part-time jobs, life is a bit nuts (when is it not, but there are phases), and my friend begins suggesting that I would like Supernatural.  My cousin chimes in (I should thank her for letting me borrow the series on DVD).  A guy friend offers that if I don’t like the show, I can come back and punch him.  So I give it a whirl…and I still don’t like the horror bits.  Then, I get hooked.  It becomes, how many episodes can I watch before I go to work?  Oh, let’s watch one in the evening.  Which then becomes, how many can I watch before I fall asleep?  The eleventh season was getting ready to air and I only had up through season nine on disc.  So I bought season ten to watch on Amazon, because I had to find out what happened.  (And this was just about the point that “binge” watching was becoming a thing). I know my friend got numerous texts from me as I watched, usually like “What!!” or “this just happened!”  I mean, it did take a little suspense away from the early seasons because hey, I knew they survived till season nine or whatever.

I utterly fell in love with Sam and Dean Winchester.  I fell in love with brothers who would do anything for each other.  They were tough guys, but they showed vulnerability around each other.  I wanted to wrap them up in hugs.  I also probably yelled at them for being stupid idiots.

And of course, I dived into the fandom and found it thriving.  And I discovered Jared’s “Always Keep Fighting” campaign.  And that helped.  Because life it hard sometimes.  I could look at Sam and Dean, and I could look at Jared and Jensen, and see strength, and see the love they have for each other.  Finding out that Jared and Jensen are like brothers in real life is heartwarming.  And if the Winchesters can face down death and demons and monsters, I can face down the dark thoughts in my head. 

Sadly, all good things must come to an end, as much as we wish this show could go on forever.  And these wonderful men have their own families they want to be with.  Even though I’ve never attended a convention, I’ve watched bits online and I think it is utterly wonderful that Jared and Jensen, and Misha, and all the rest have embraced the fandom so much.  I’m grateful for what we’ve had from this show.  And the fandom will never die.  Heck, look at Harry Potter, Star Wars, and Lord of the Rings, all still going strong.  And I will certainly continue to re-watch and re-watch this show.

*SPOILER ALERT*  It didn’t really hit me that the show was ending until Castiel’s goodbye.  There have been sacrifices throughout the show; John for Dean, Dean for Sam, Sam for Dean.  But this was a final sacrifice.  We know there won’t be any coming back.  And Cas’s voice changes a bit.  It’s now Misha.  And he’s saying everything we know and feel about Dean.  And I have tears pouring down my face.  (I’m re-watching it and I still cry).  Cas says “I love you,” to Dean…which could run from and include friendship love to romantic love…and I’m okay with that.  Then Dean crying at the end of the episode, my heart breaks.  I had to sit for a minute and process everything once it ended.

The penultimate episode went differently than I expected.  I figured there would be a huge, bloody showdown.  There was, a little…then Chuck is de-powered and Jack is the new God.  And leaves the boys.  I cry a little, for the boys.  I felt it was a satisfying conclusion for Jack; in all, I think the finale was well thought and planned out.  I know there are shows that just suddenly end, or the writers quickly have to come up with a way to conclude everything and it’s rushed and it shows.  The montage at the end had me in tears and it almost wrapped up the series there.

I reiterate SPOILER ALERT: Going into the final episode, I had hope that maybe it would end happy; the boys live and have families, or just carry on doing their job.  Originally, I figured the show would end bloody.  And it had to be both boys going, together.  And I kind of wanted Jody and Donna and all the other alive characters to gather to say goodbye to the boys.  And all the ones in heaven to be gathered there to greet them.  Starting the interview portion with the musical episode rendition of Carry On Wayward Son had me in tears early.  Then the episode didn’t start with the original version and I was a bit confused.  I’m glad Dean has a dog (especially since both Jared and Jensen have dogs).  Masked bad guys are creepy, but we’re getting to the hunt a bit early.  I don’t really remember that girl from the earlier season.  Then Dean’s pinned.  And it’s only halfway through…and I’m sobbing into a pillow (I’m crying again). 

Because yes, Dean was always going to go out fighting.  Saying he’s proud of Sam, oh, there’s a stab in my heart.  Beautiful acting on Jensen’s part, the hitches in his breath.  And they echo from the pilot “I can’t do this alone. …  I don’t want to.”  And Dean will always be with us, and he urges all of us to keep fighting.  I’m just begging, “not without Sam.”  Like I mentioned, I figured they both had to go at the same time.  Dean just can’t leave Sam alone.  There was the single man tear…and sobbing alongside Sam.

Heaven was beautiful (I think the crew took the opportunity to showcase Canadian scenery) and yes, it was nice to see Bobby again.  And the car.  Carry On Wayward Son finally plays and Dean’s smiling and driving.  I’m still crying.  Sam gets a life, like Dean always wanted for him (I kind of wonder who he married).  Sam was weird looking as an old guy, and honestly, I expected him to pass in the car, though it was touching that his son told him it was okay.  And of course I’m happy Sam is back with Dean, where he belongs.  A final hug for us.  I can see how there may be a short run sequel or movie or something…Dean and Sam’s Adventures in Heaven or something.  So yes, satisfying.  And so heart wrenching.

Let’s all take a breath… (Spoilers are finished)

I know both guys have projects coming up soon; they’ve already started teasers for Walker, and I’ll record it and watch it.  Not sure I’ll try to get into The Boys, but I might find scenes with Jensen to watch.  Not sure I’m ready to see these boys in something other than Supernatural, as characters other than Sam and Dean.  I keep reminding myself of the Dr. Seuss quote that is very applicable now: Don’t cry because it’s over, Smile because it happened.  I will be forever grateful to this wonderful show (and to my friend for introducing me).  The fandom and the SPNFamily will live and carry on.  I’m sure there will be dissenting views on the ending, but hey, that’s what fanfiction is for.  A huge thank you to Jared and Jensen for these wonderful characters and all the cast and crew and writers for a show about love and family, even through dark times.

(Because we could all use some hugs right now)

“I also have a mortgage, and two cats to feed.”

Spectre

The most recent Bond film and this is the first movie in my blog series that I have not previously watched.  I enjoyed this more than I thought I would.  Of course, Daniel Craig is back as James Bond, Ralph Fiennes as M, Ben Whishaw as Q, and Naomie Harris as Moneypenny.  Andrew Scott (Moriarty in Sherlock) slinks through as C, Dave Bautista (such a surprise to see Drax of Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy) as the mostly silently and basically never named Hinx.  We briefly see Léa Seydoux, who plays Madeleine Swann in this film, in Robin Hood as Isabella of Angoulême.  Christoph Waltz (Richelieu in the newer Three Musketeers film; making him the second Bond villain to come out of that movie; Mads Mikkelsen was Le Chiffre in Casino Royale before he was Rochefort) is creepy as Blofeld.

This is the first of Craig’s Bond films to open with the gun barrel sequence.  It opens properly on a Day of the Dead celebration in Mexico and everyone is walking around wearing skeleton masks…off to a creepy start.  The camera follows one man in a skeleton suit, he follows a woman to her room and removes his mask to reveal Bond.  Except he has more important things to do that bed an all too willing woman.  He just causally walks along the roof’s edge to set up an assassination shot.  The building ends up blowing (though I’m not certain that was caused by Bond) and crumbles towards him.  A well placed sofa saves him from breaking bones when he falls.  He then pursues his target through the parade towards the city’s square.  A helicopter is waiting for the bad guy.  Bond jumps in after him and there is a terrifying fight between the two men; terrifying because it causes a helicopter to spin wildly over a crowd of people.  Bond manages to kick his target out of the helicopter, then the pilot, and regain control of the helicopter and steers it safely away from the crowd [because it’s hard to view the main character as a hero if he kills loads of innocent people just to get his man, ten minutes into the film.]

The opening credits continue the creepy vibe by featuring an octopus.  There are flashbacks to Silva, Vesper, M, and Chiffre (and I will admit, Daniel Craig does not look too bad shirtless).  In London, Bond is in trouble with M again.  His mission to Mexico was not sanctioned and it does not help the situation that MI6 is merging with MI5, calling the double-0 program into question.  Bond is introduced to the man overseeing the change, Max Denbigh, whom Bond refers to as C.  Denbigh’s brilliant plan is that human agents are no longer needed; drones can gather all the intelligence they need (continuing the debate from Skyfall).  Bond has Moneypenny bring his personal effects from Skyfall to his sparse apartment.  And he trusts her enough to reveal that his mission is a dying request from the previous M.  A video had arrived in his mail shortly after her death, instructing him to hunt down a man and attend his funeral.  Moneypenny agrees to help cover for Bond and do some research for him on “the Pale King.”  In the personal effects, we see a copy of temporary guardianship paperwork for a young James Bond, along with a photograph.

Tanner fills Bond in further on C’s new plans.  The old MI6 building will be demolished and an impersonal glass skyscraper has been erected to house C’s surveillance.  He wants to get the whole world in on it and give access to those countries.  Q has set up shop away from prying eyes.  He implants nanotechnology to keep track of Bond, per M’s orders.  Oh, there’s a new car, but not for Bond.  Q is working on rebuilding the vintage Aston Martin, but Bond misunderstood his instruction to bring the car back in one piece, not bring back one piece of the car.  Q has a new watch for Bond; it tells time.  Bond asks Q for a favor; make him disappear, for forty-eight hours.  [And yes, Bond is totally flirting with Q; Q gets flustered; and it’s rather adorable.  And a bit hilarious]  Q returns to his bunker later in the evening to discover the new Aston Martin gone. 

Bond jets off to Rome to observe the funeral as M instructed.  He saves the widow’s life and seduces her to get information on her husband.  He was part of a dangerous organization that is now meeting.  Bond takes the man’s ring as his ticket into the meeting.  The bad guys have organized and are reporting how their criminal activities are progressing.  The leader remains in the shadows and they are all silent as a henchman kills a member for the honor of going after “the Pale King.”  The leader is aware that Bond is present and welcomes him.  Bond gets out, but the silent henchman follows him in an equally fancy sports car.  The gadgets aren’t all quite installed, but the rear flame throwers at least work.  And the ejector seat (so Bond lets a brand new shiny car just sink into the river).  He calls up Moneypenny while he’s driving and she reports that Bond has run into the Pale King before; he was known as Quantum, or Mr. White.  Bond has a new direction, but he needs Moneypenny to also look up Franz Oberhauser, someone presumed dead.

Back in London, C is getting closer to success with his goal.  Q lies to M to cover for Bond.  Bond jets off to Austria and finds Mr. White.  The old man is already dying, but he’ll let Bond protect his daughter in order to lead him to the organization he’s searching for.  Then commits suicide to cut short his agonizing death.  Bond meets up with Madeleine Swann, though she has no desire to be involved with her deceased father’s life.  Q also shows up, with orders to bring Bond in.  Bond hands off the ring and goes after Swann’s kidnappers, led by the silent Rome guy.  Q is almost nabbed, but escapes in a crowd and Bond utterly crashes a small airplane (bit by bit, losing wings, then the tail).  Swann finally agrees to go with Bond.  Q fills them in that Bond was right; there is something to this ring.  All of his previous enemies, Greene, Chiffre, Silva, are all connected to Oberhauser, the head of the villainous organization Spectre.

The L’Americain that White mentioned is not a person, Swann reveals, but a hotel in Tangier.  She resists Bond’s advances, but insists on accompanying him.  Bond discovers a secret room (and a tape of Vesper Lynd’s interrogation…even after this time, he still mourns her).  He and Swann are now off to the desert.  Back in London, C is continuing to succeed with his intelligence data plan.  M points out, just like Bond did in Skyfall, that a  man on the ground is the only way to make the decision whether someone needs to die or not.  Unfortunately, C has managed to shut down the double-0 program.  C mocks M, calling him the past.  M retorts that C is a cocky little bastard.  Q and Moneypenny go to M with information on Bond, but he orders them to hide it.  C is watching MI6 agents; they’ll just lead him to Bond.  They must abandon him (even though Bond is a pain in the butt, M still protects him).

Rome guy attacks Swann and Bond on their train and Bond almost loses.  Madeleine luckily knows how to use a gun (side effect of her father that she dislikes) and rescues Bond.  He manages to get Rome guy off the train.  What to do now?  Why have sex, of course.  The pair eventually make it to a complex in the middle of the desert.  And their host is playing mind games, leaving personal pictures in their rooms.  Blofeld, the leader of Spectre is their host and his complex houses intelligence gathering; C is one of his stooges…meaning if C’s program goes online, Spectre will have further access, spelling trouble for governments.  While Bond has come to kill Blofeld, Blofeld has brought Bond to his complex to die.  He is the author of Bond’s pain; he is behind the villains Bond has faced recently.  He is ultimately responsible for Vesper’s death, and M’s death.  “You interfered in my world; I destroyed yours,” Blofeld comments.  Blofeld also turns out to be Franz Oberhauser.  His father was awarded guardianship of Bond and asked Franz to be the orphan’s brother.  Franz disliked the notion and arranged to kill his father and has spent his life seeking revenge on Bond by destroying all he loves (cause that makes a whole lot of sense).

He knocks Bond out and straps him into a chair.  Swann will watch as Blofeld probes Bond’s mind, ultimately killing him.  Yeah, those drills are disturbing.  While Blofeld monologues to Madeleine, Bond removes his watch.  Madeleine comes over to whisper she loves Bond when they figure Blofeld’s next move will be the killing one.  Bond hands Swann the watch and it starts an explosion in the complex.  Bond escapes, with Swann.  Explosions ramp up until the whole complex is engulfed in flames (this set the Guinness world record for the world’s largest film stunt explosion ever).

But it’s not the end.  Bond meets with M, Q, Tanner, and Moneypenny.  They’re going after C.  Q will hack in and stop C’s program.  But Bond is taken hostage on the drive over; M escapes and joins up with the other three (Madeleine has decided she cannot be part of this life and leaves…dangerous move).  Bond is  taken to the old MI6 building, which is rigged with explosives and escapes his captors, but follows the arrows down into the depths of the building [by the way, that trick with the zip-tie cuffs; you can legitimately escape that way {it’s even explained in The Official MacGyver Survival Manual}].  M continues with the plan and confronts C (who sounds so much like Moriarty…can we push him off a building yet?).  M gets the upper hand and Q is finally successful in shutting down C’s program.  M and C struggle for the gun and C falls down several floors.  Pictures of those who have died around Bond are posted to mess with his head and Bond discovers Blofeld isn’t dead yet.  Scarred, yes, over one eye, but not dead.  And he has Madeleine.  Will Bond choose to save himself and live with the regret, or die trying to save the woman who may understand him, being the daughter of an assassin?  Of course, Bond races after Madeleine, the three minute countdown on.  He rescues her, but they only have seconds.  They jump through the floor, caught by a net.  Blofeld and the four MI6 agents watch as the old building collapses.  Bond and Swann escape by boat and chase after Blofeld.  Bond brings down the helicopter and strides towards Blofeld who is crawling from the wreckage.  M watches at one end, and Swann at the other.  Bond does not shoot.  He chooses Swann, tossing his gun.  M makes the arrest.

Bond visits Q one last time, to retrieve his original Aston Martin.  Swann is in the passenger seat.  The Bond theme plays as Bond smiles and drives off.  So, did Bond just retire?  According to press released on the upcoming twenty-fifth Bond film, No Time to Die [why is it that “die” features in a lot of Bond titles?], Bond did indeed retire.  The new film will take place several years after the events of Spectre.  Blofeld and Madeleine Swann will both return and Rami Malek is slated to portray the villain.  I do hope the movie makes its November release; after watching Spectre, I am geared up to watch what is possibly Daniel Craig’s final Bond film.

I enjoyed this film more than I thought I would, but I still consider it creepy.  I’m not as likely to watch this one over and over like I do with Skyfall.  So, Pierce versus Daniel?  Pierce is the classic James Bond to me; suave, charming.  His Bond has the highest body count, but there’s an elegant style.  Daniel; they just like to beat him up.  And there’s lots of action, lots and lots of action.  Chase scenes within chase scenes.  But I prefer the storylines from Daniel’s time, despite being darker than Pierce’s.  That may have to do with how movies have changed over twenty years or so. 

As mentioned, Skyfall is my favorite Bond film (a bit to my mother’s disappointment, I believe).  I do like the direction they’ve taken Moneypenny and Q; making them more active.  Samantha Bond and Pierce Brosnan had excellent flirt chemistry and that Moneypenny certainly wanted to sleep with Bond, despite his reputation.  Naomie Harris’s Moneypenny is an action girl, a good pairing with Bond.  And Ben Whishaw as Q is adorable.  [And I certainly subscribe to the fan notion that he is the third Holmes brother; his resemblance to Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock is uncanny.]  Judi Dench is the primary M I know and she played it marvelously.  She was more ruthless with Daniel Craig, but you saw how much Bond cared for M in Skyfall.  I have determined that Bond needs someone to protect.  That is how he operates.  And I love that about the character; I think I love that in a character period (the Winchester brothers, Hiccup in How to Train Your Dragon…characters who will throw themselves into danger to protect someone).

I haven’t quite decided with the reboot if it changes the notion that James Bond is a bit like Doctor Who: the Doctor has many faces, but they are all the Doctor.  So mayhaps, James Bond is a codename.  Skyfall insinuates that this is the true James Bond.

As just mentioned; I hold to the idea that Q is a Holmes.  And there are several fanfiction authors who have written brilliant pieces.  And warning; they often pair the new Q with Bond.  I’m okay with that.

I highly recommend ktwontwo’s series starting with Brothers Three.

A Wandering Minstrel has several good oneshots

And I recently discovered over on AO3, White_Noise’s series The Other Life of Quentin Holmes, Quartermaster

Also on AO3, Beginte has a wonderful Work and Play series, amongst other oneshots.

Threshold by AtoTheBean is a wonderful Spetre fix-it where Q is actually the one who gets kidnapped by Blofeld.

And I have utterly fallen in love with Only­_1_Truth’s stories.  The Chaos and Logic Chronicles are delicious at times and are apparently a play off of Neil Gaiman’s American Gods book [which I have not read, but I now might be interested in].  I’ll Be Your Light, Your Match, Your Burning Sun is rather good, as is Alley-Cat Quartermaster.

Next Time: Another film series based on bestselling books; these by Tom Clancy, starting with Hunt for Red October

“Cry God, for Harry, England, and St. George!”

Partaking in something that satisfies both the historian in me and the English major: Shakespeare.  Now, I believe I have mentioned before that I am not a dutiful English major; I don’t like Shakespeare, well, I don’t like reading Shakespeare.  It’s boring and most teachers pound it into our skulls by analyzing it to death.  I hate that.  But, BBC put together a phenomenal cast and put Shakespeare’s histories on screen (which I am aware has been done before, heck, I tried to watch a version of Macbeth starring Patrick Stewart and couldn’t make it through it.  Now, there was a slightly modern version of Hamlet done with David Tennant that was fantastic).  They timed the first arc to coincide with the 2012 London Olympics; this arc included Richard II, Henry IV parts I and II, and Henry V.  Their second arc included Henry VI and Richard III in 2016.

Gut reactions?  Richard II was a bit odd.  Henry IV was wonderful to see and Henry V is utterly magnificent.  Henry VI is simply everyone changing sides and the start of the War of the Roses and is interesting to see from this perspective.  As for Richard III; I remember doing a segment on the historical accuracy of the play in a British history course in college and I can certainly see the Tudor propaganda in the play (oh, they all cut out and condense history, but then, these are plays, not true histories…actually, I’d like to see historical documentaries on these people), yet I now see what all the hype is about.

Above all, these are a veritable who’s who in British acting.

Richard II stars Ben Whishaw (Q in Craig’s James Bond and Michael Banks in Mary Poppins Returns) as the king.  Opposite him is Rory Kinnear (also appears with Whishaw in Skyfall, and Spectre as Bill Tanner, which he briefly played in Quantum of Solace as well) as Bolingbroke, who goes on to be crowned Henry IV.  The great Patrick Stewart appears as John of Gaunt.  If Thomas Mowbray, who argues with Bolingbroke, looks familiar, that’s because he’s played by James Purefoy, who portrays Colville aka Edward, the Black Prince of Wales in A Knight’s Tale [making this a bit funny to a historian, because Edward, the Black Prince of Wales was Richard II’s father: his father was King Edward III, but he died before his father did and so thus, his son inherited the throne].  David Morrissey appears as the Earl of Northumberland.  He’s also been the Duke of Norfolk in The Other Boleyn Girl [uncle to Anne], and has appeared in a 2008 episode of Doctor Who, “The Next Doctor”.  We briefly see David Bradley (Filch in Harry Potter and Walter Frey in Game of Thrones) as the gardener and Lindsay Duncan (also appeared in a 2009 episode of Doctor Who, “Water of Mars,” she was the mother in Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland, a queen in two episodes of Merlin, and Lady Smallwood in several episodes of Sherlock) as the Duchess of York.

The very gifted Jeremy Irons (Scar in The Lion King [the animated classic], Tiberius in Kingdom of Heaven, Brom in Eragon, Aramis in The Man in the Iron Mask, and Alfred in several of DC’s newer Batman movies) takes over as the older Henry IV.  Tom Hiddleston (we love him as Loki in the MCU) shines as Prince Hal.  Julie Walters (Mrs. Wealsey in Harry Potter and Rosie in both Mamma Mia movies) is Mistress Quickly, Robert Pugh (he’s Craster in Game of Thrones, amongst other roles in Kingdom of Heaven, The White Queen [which also depicts the War of the Roses], and Master and Commander) is Owain Glyndŵr [that is the proper spelling, IMDB lists him as Owen Glendower; a real Welsh rebel that I’ve got a book on].  Oh hey, there’s Michelle Dockery (Mary in Downton Abbey) as Kate Percy, and Harry Lloyd (Baines in 2007’s Doctor Who “Human Nature” and “The Family of Blood,” Will Scarlett in BBC’s Robin Hood, and insane Viserys Targaryen in Game of Thrones) is Mortimer, and Joe Armstrong (Allan a Dale in Robin Hood) is Hotspur.  His father, Alum Armstrong (he’s had roles in Van Helsing, Braveheart, and Patriot Games amongst others) plays Hotspur’s father Northumberland, and Iain Glen (Jorah Mormont in Game of Thrones, Sir Richard Carlisle in Downton Abbey, and 2010’s Doctor Who “The Time of Angels” and “Flash and Stone”) pops up as Warwick.

Of course, Prince Hal graduates to King Henry V in the next installment.  This was the bit that makes me almost like Shakespeare.  Tom Hiddleston delivers some of the best known speeches with such quiet passion.  “Once more unto the breach,” stirs my blood, and he got the role of Henry V with “St. Crispin’s day,” which includes that famous line: “we few/ we happy few/ we band of brothers.”  One almost cries.  And his wooing of Katherine…if a dashing man ever said those words to me, I’d be weak-kneed.  I remember rehearsals for faire, male cast members are encouraged to woo female patrons (worked on me when I was a patron), and so they practiced on female cast members; I was just happy some guy was saying nice words to me, I didn’t really care what he was saying.

If Corporal Nym [grrr, I hate his name’s “Nym,” because I want to use it for a headstrong female character in my saga] looks familiar, he’s Tom Brooke and he’s appeared briefly in a few Sherlock episodes.  And look, there’s Richard Griffiths (Vernon Dursely in Harry Potter, King George in On Stranger Tides) as the Duke of Burgundy [this was one of his last roles].  The ever talented John Hurt (the dragon Kilgarah in Merlin, the War Doctor of Doctor Who, Ollivander in Harry Potter, Professor Oxley in Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, Montrose in Rob Roy, and other roles going back to the 60’s)  acts as the chorus [and he just passed away in 2017].  Some other familiar faces join us in Henry V; Anton Lesser (Qyburn in Game of Thrones, an episode of The Musketeers, Harold Warne in Miss Potter, and other roles) as Exeter [he’ll stay on through Henry VI and Richard III] and Owen Teale (part of some older Doctor Who episodes, The Last Legion, and the Headmaster in Tolkien, but I’m sure we recognize him as Thorne in Game of Thrones ) as Captain Fluellen.

Tom Sturridge takes up the mantle of Henry VI.  Sophie Okonedo (Liz Ten in “The Beast Below” and “The Pandorica Opens” in 2010’s Doctor Who) joins him as Margaret of Anjou, and Hugh Bonneville (Robert Crawley in Downton Abbey, Monuments Men, several episodes of Doctor Who as a pirate captain, he was even in Tomorrow Never Dies) is so encouraging as Gloucester.  Michael Gambon (Dumbledore in Harry Potter, Lord Charles Fox in Amazing Grace, and he’s even appeared in Doctor Who 2010’s “A Christmas Carol”) briefly appears as Mortimer.

In the second part, Benedict Cumberbatch (Doctor Strange, Sherlock, Khan in Star Trek: Into Darkness, amongst other roles) pops up as the Duke of York [called Plantagenet in Shakespeare as a claimant to the old royal dynasty]’s son Richard.  Phoebe Fox (the Duchess of Savoy in The Musketeers) is Anne Neville.  James Fleet as Hastings has been in several period pieces.  And say hello to the appearance of Andrew Scott (C in Spectre and Moriarty in Sherlock) as King Louis of France.  Somerset is played by Ben Miles (Peter Townsend in The Crown), and George, the Duke of Clarence is played by Sam Troughton (Much in BBC’s Robin Hood).

Benedict takes center stage in Richard III.  He is brilliant in the role.  I dislike the character of Richard, but Benedict delivers exquisitely.  Let me go on a little historical accuracy rant: historical evidence proves that Richard was not a hunchback; he may have had a slight difference in shoulder height, but is regarded to have been a tall, broad-shouldered man.  Nor was he the “Machiavellian villain” Shakespeare depicts him as, at least, no more than any other man of that time.  Shakespeare wrote him as a villain to please the Elizabethan court in order to paint her grandfather as a benevolent conqueror.  As another historian pointed out to me, if Richard had the princes of the tower in his custody, he could have produced them in order to throw suspicion off himself.  We also get the addition of Judi Dench as Richard’s mother, Cecily.

Historical note: there are several “Duke of Gloucester” throughout the plays and throughout history, because it is a title, typically a relative of the monarch.  Same as the Duke of York, and Mortimer is a title (which I got confused a bit, seeing a Mortimer in Henry IV and one in Henry VI.)  I swear, one needs a family tree to reference when watching these histories.  I’ll try to explain the central plot of the War of the Roses as best I can.  Edward III had several sons, the eldest of which was Edward, the Black Prince of Wales.  His third son (his second died young-ish) was John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, his fourth son was Edmund, holding the title Duke of York, and his fifth son was Thomas, the Duke of Gloucester.  The Black Prince’s son was Richard II.  The way that Bolingbroke claimed the throne was that he had a right to it as the son of Edward’s third son (hence, Richard and Bolingbroke were cousins and until Bolingbroke’s exile, they were close).  Bolingbroke became Henry IV [Lancaster], who has at least four sons, the eldest of whom became Henry V.  Henry V died tragically young and his son, Henry VI, assumed the throne incredibly young, only nine months old.  England was ruled by the Lord Protector, his uncle, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (one of Henry V’s brothers).

Then along comes Richard, Duke of York (the great-great-grandson of the Edward III’s second son by way of Lionel, Duke of Clarence’s daughter, then grandson, then great-granddaughter).  Just like Bolingbroke challenged Richard II for the throne due to ineptitude, the Duke of York [white rose] challenged Henry VI [followers wore a red rose].  The Duke of York’s son, Edward took the throne, becoming King Edward IV.  He had three children with Elizabeth Woodville; Elizabeth of York, Edward (briefly Edward V), and Richard (also holding the title Duke of York).   Edward IV has several younger brothers, including George, the Duke of Clarence, and Richard, the Duke of Gloucester.  Once Edward IV and George were dead, Richard declared Edward IV’s marriage to Elizabeth Woodville unlawful, making his offspring with her illegitimate.  He took the throne as Richard III.  There’s the York contingent.

But back with John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, his second marriage produced several generations, to John Beaufort, the Earl of Somerset, then his son John, then his daughter Margaret Beaufort, who married Edmund Tudor, the Earl of Richmond, and then had Henry, who in Shakespeare was called Richmond, thus making him the Lancastrian claimant.  [Edmund Tudor was the son of Owen Tudor (a Welshman), who married the widowed Katherine (wife of Henry V)…as for Henry V’s claim of “I am Welsh, as you know,”…well, he was Prince of Wales and born there, but not actually Welsh by blood; I would guess it was a line Shakespeare inserted to play to Queen Elizabeth’s Welsh ancestry].  Henry Tudor became Henry VII and he married Elizabeth of York (remember, Edward IV’s eldest daughter) and uniting the Lancastrians and Yorkists and ending the War of the Roses  From here, we should know how things go from there for a bit.

This is the sort of stuff that fascinates me as a historian; how the different lines come together and play out.  And I understand Shakespeare’s language a bit better watching it performed, more of a dialogue rather than verse.

On a different note: I highly recommend Netflix’s Enola Holmes film.  Millie Bobby Brown is precisely the female heroine we need; smart and not afraid of action.  Henry Cavill is a calmer Sherlock Holmes, but I greatly desire to see more of these characters.  I may just check out the novels the film was based on.

Dead Ends

Quantum of Solace

Craig’s second outing as Bond.  Gemma Arterton (Tamina in Prince of Persia: Sands of Time) briefly appears as Strawberry Fields [homage to the Beatles perhaps] and there’s a brief appearance at the end by Stana Katic (Kate Beckett opposite Nathan Fillion in Castle [loved that show; and there was mention in an early episode of Richard Castle potentially ghostwriting James Bond books, lol], and Simone Renoir in The Librarian: Curse of the Judas Chalice [we’ll be covering those soon]).  This is a direct sequel to Casino Royale, picking up within twenty-four hours of the previous tale ending.  Oddly, it starts silent with a fast car chase, until the sound drops in and you have to rush to turn down the volume.  I almost thought they were going to wreck an Aston Martin within the first five minutes; it loses a door and is certainly scraped up, but still drivable at the end.  Bond naturally dispatches with his pursuers and pulls Mr. White out of his trunk to face interrogation.  M is clearly worried about Bond before they go in to interrogate Mr. White.

But he holds a card up his sleeve, so to speak; his organization has so far stayed off MI6’s radar and they have people everywhere, including M’s own bodyguard to her surprise.  Bond chases him and ends up shooting him (after causing destruction along the way in typical Bond fashion).  When he returns, Mr. White is gone.  M is angry with the turn of events and frustrated to learn that Mr. White was correct; how does an organization like that exist and MI6 doesn’t know about them?  How did one of their people get to be her personal bodyguard for several years and not get flagged?  MI6 does manage to track tagged money used by Le Chiffre to pay off associates.  Bond heads to Haiti to hopefully pick up a new contact.  But a fight breaks out easily in the man’s hotel room and Bond kills him in self defense.  He then takes the man’s briefcase and meets a young woman named Camille.  Inside the briefcase is her picture and gun, so she throws Bond out of the car.  But he pursues her and discovers that her boyfriend, Dominic Greene had arranged for her to be killed.  Well, that didn’t work, so he passes her along to an old enemy to cement a deal he’s working in Bolivia.  Bond goes after the girl again, ending in a high speed boat chase (they still like to beat this Bond up; apparently Daniel Craig was injured three times filming this movie).

Bond asks MI6 about Dominic Greene and M checks with the CIA.  They claim to not know anything; in fact, they’re tracking the man and he’s even getting on a private jet with them.  They make the deal to ignore the upcoming regime change in Bolivia in return for oil.  M orders Bond to follow them, but please avoid killing every possible lead.  Bond winds up at a party, sneaking into a tux and getting a hold of an earpiece.  He overhears a business deal amongst the wealthy and interrupts them.  Several of the key players leave and he snaps photos, then goes after Greene.  It’s still a bit of a mess and M tries to restrict Bond’s movement; Bond responds by staying in Italy and looking up Mathis.  He was found innocent of betrayal from the previous movie and agrees to accompany Bond to Bolivia.  The pretty Miss Fields is waiting for him with orders to return directly to London.  Bond insists in his usual manner on staying.  He quickly charms Miss Fields (and she hates herself for it) and they’re invited to Dominic Greene’s charity gala.  Camille shows up to confront Dominic and Bond gets her out.  Miss Fields helps by tripping Greene’s bodyguard.

The police, who are supposed to be on Bond’s side, stop him.  Greene’s already gotten to them.  Mathis is discovered in the back of the car, beaten.  He’s then mortally shot and Bond consents to stay with the man as he dies.  Mathis’s final words to Bond are to forgive Vesper, who truly loved him, and for Bond to forgive himself.  Bond then takes Camille into the desert to look into Greene’s property.  A fighter plane chases them after they get a plane of their own.  Bond forces it into a cliff, but they have to dodge a helicopter.  They jump out of their plane with one parachute and discover once they land that Greene has dammed the water, creating a drought.  There is no oil.  The pair manages to get back to Bond’s hotel.  He meets with M and finds out that Miss Fields was killed; she’s lying on his bed covered in oil (an homage to Goldfinger).  M has already been told by the higher ups that they are fine with dealing with Greene; there is no evidence of foul play and they need the oil.  Bond is running wild and may have been turned; the Americans have orders to kill him.  She suspends Bond from duty and he seems to go quietly.  Until they’re in the elevator and he escapes.  He assures M that he is good.  M knows he’s on to something and she’ll protect her agent, to hell with the CIA.

We see Greene’s deal, handling the regime change and he confesses that the Quantum organization now controls over sixty percent of the water in Bolivia; the new leader will have to use them for utilities.  If he doesn’t comply, they will simply find a new leader.  Camille moves in on the general, who murdered her family and burned down her house.  They fight and Camille manages to kill the man, but a huge fire has started, thanks to Bond trying to take Greene, trapping her in the room.  Greene and Bond fight as explosions rock around them.  Bond makes the choice to save Camille, rather than killing Greene there.  The worm crawls away.  Camille is terrified by the fire and Bond is willing to shoot them before the fire takes them, but at the last minute, causes another explosion to create an opening out of the room.  He picks up Greene, gets his information, and leaves the man in the middle of the desert.  Camille returns to Bolivia to help in the wake of recent events.  Bond’s next stop is Russia.  He has tracked down Vesper’s boyfriend; who is not in danger and already has another girlfriend [Hello, Stana].  She is Canadian intelligence and Bond advises her to report to her agency that they have a leak; the boyfriend will get captured and she will be blackmailed for information…just like Vesper.  Bond does leave him alive, to M’s surprise.  She’s squared the situation with the U.S.  “Bond, I need you back.”  “I never left.”

This film is very disjointed.  A reason for that may be that it came about during the writers’ strike and the script was finished by Craig and the director.  The villain is bland and at least Bond doesn’t sleep with the main girl this time (though he sleeps with Strawberry Fields and bad things happen).  Admittedly, we do see Bond risk his life to save the girl and he tries to not leave destruction everywhere he goes; it’s just the side effect of him doing his job.  Yet, it’s still not a well like movie.

Up Next: My favorite Bond film, Skyfall

I apologize for the brief absence; between work and a well-deserved vacation, I haven’t been on my computer often.  But I’ve got the next batch of posts already drafted up to the point I tend to take a holiday hiatus.  Plan seems to be to finish off James Bond (and the latest movie release date still seems up in the air…I’d really like to see it!) then round up the Tom Clancy Jack Ryan films.  At that point, it will be hiatus time, but I’ve got the next several months planned out after that (yes, most likely will only be one post a week so I can maintain some other writing and reading projects.  But I love these action films, so I will not abandon them).

Besides, I went on a bit of a Shakespeare stint for a few days off, so you get a bonus post today.  I guess it would fall under the “Random Fandom” label, though it’s not a fandom I tend to fall into.

Speaking of fandoms: the final seven episodes of Supernatural begin airing this week and I am…looking forward in a way to see what will happen.  I may share some thoughts on the end.  The new MacGyver has been renewed for a fifth season, but no word on when it will air because I don’t think they’ve even started filming yet.

Coming Soon to a Theatre Near You…Maybe

A Random Fandom Update!

Since this topic of conversation came up, thought I might go over my musings on some upcoming films.

Enola Holmes: Saw the ad for this, coming to Netflix September 23rd.  It looks exciting!  The premise is Enola is the younger sister to the famous Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes.  Her mother (not sure if it’s their mother as well) has gone missing and she’s called them in for help.  Sherlock, played by Henry Cavill, seems nice.  Mycroft looks like a prick who wants to turn their younger sister into a “proper young lady.”  And I love that Enola is decidedly not.  Looking forward to this!

Black Widow: I will admit, I was excited when this was first announced.  Black Widow totally deserves her own film and Marvel did great with Captain Marvel.  Then the trailer released and I finally read that it takes place between Civil War and Infinity War, which helps make sense.  Yes, I totally want to see Black Widow’s origins and her kicking butt, however, the armor looks out of place.  Black Widow wears sleek suits so she can slide between her opponents and she’s trained to avoid hits.  And the “family” aspect…seems a bit out of place.  Honestly, we want the movie that is Hawkeye and Black Widow in Budapest, teased in Avengers. Will I see it?  Of course.

Mulan: I am not going to pay the higher premium to watch in on Disney+, I’ll wait till it’s properly released and you can rent it like normal.  I get that Disney is taking the story back to its more original roots, but I feel like it’s going to lose that Disney touch.  It’s not a musical, though they seem to be using the Reflections theme.  And with the more serious tone, they’ve probably lost Mushu and he was half the fun!  At some point I’ll watch it.

Wonder Woman 1984: Still excited about this one because I love the first one.  Steve Trevor is back and I’d love to know how.  The most recent trailer shows Diana’s adversary who transforms into a cat somehow?  I will admit, I am not up on Wonder Woman lore, but it just makes me cock my head and go “huh.”  The gold suit looks ridiculous, especially after how awesome they made her armor in the first film.  Will still see, possibly in theatres.

No Time To Die: The twenty-fifth James Bond film and appears to pick up after Spectre.  Bond has retired with Madeleine Swann, though they don’t appear to still be a couple in the trailer.  Bond is called back to action.  I mean, now that I’m caught up on the new Bond films, I definitely want to see this and see how things play out.  I am currently enjoying a slew of James Bond/Sherlock crossover stories; some of the dialogue is absolutely hilarious.

Of course there is also the final seven episodes of Supernatural due out in October and November.  I guarantee I will cry.  I go back and forth on how I think they will end it.  I believe Jensen Ackles has stated he would be willing to come back and do a movie; so they can’t fully kill the boys off, but then how else are you going to end the show?  In case there isn’t a film?  Pretty sure their destiny is to die, saving the world (as long as you make sure idiot Chuck goes first)

We shall eagerly wait and see how all these stories play out.

Bond film blogs will continue.

Tiding Over

A Random Fandom Update:

I happen to be listening to the Pirates of the Caribbean soundtracks recently, which makes me want to re-watch the first trilogy.  They also have inspired a few scenes and notes for my eventual fantasy epic (which is good, because it needs some major work).  And yep, still love the first three movies!  The original is still the best and looking back, I feel some pity for the special effects team because it could not have been easy timing all the moonlight skeleton effects.  Orlando Bloom is young a dashing (he was a celebrity crush when I was a teen) and still swoon at the kiss at the end 🙂

I like elements of Dead Man’s Chest soundtrack and the battle against the Kraken is thrilling.  And the ending of At World’s End is full of emotions.  That flourish in the orchestra during Will and Elizabeth’s wedding times perfectly with the spin, squee!  And Most.  Epic.  Kiss.  Ever!  Of course, I have to find the few clips of Will in the fifth movie and I think it’s sweet that they use Will and Elizabeth’s theme in the background while he talks to his young son, Henry.

I also really want a good crossover fic between Pirates of the Caribbean and Once Upon a Time because there is such a realm of possibilities between Killian Jones knowing either Jack and/ or Will.  If anyone finds a good story,  let me know so I can check it out!

In the meantime; I’ve read several novels off my shelf, re-reading a couple different fanfiction stories, but haven’t gotten much writing done.  The action-adventure blogs will be starting soon, just gotta get my brain to focus, lol!

Let me know what fandoms have been keeping you entertained!