“We solve crimes, I blog about it, and he forgets his pants.”

Season Two

A Scandal in Belgravia picks up right where The Great Game left off, in the pool, with Sherlock pointing a gun at a collection of bombs. Then Staying Alive echoes through the room from Moriarty’s phone. He asks to take the call and starts congenial, then becomes angry at what the mysterious caller is telling him; “and know that if you are lying, I will skin you,” he drags out. Turns out for Sherlock and John, “Sorry, wrong day to die,” but warns them he will be in touch. On his way out, still on the phone, he tells his friend, if they’re right, they will be rich, and if they’re wrong, they will become shoes. We see a woman end the call, then ask another mysterious person, “Have you been wicked, your highness?”

John’s blogs bring in clients, advancing the duo, particularly Sherlock, to the status of Internet phenomenon. The press start showing up at crime scenes and Sherlock has to don the infamous deerstalker hat to hide his face. Sherlock attempts to solve a case from home, wrapped in a sheet, while John does the legwork on location. Then they’re both taken to Buckingham Palace. And…Sherlock still can’t bother to put on pants. Mycroft comes in to tell Sherlock he has a new case, but the client must remain anonymous. Sherlock refuses at first, even threatening to walk away while Mycroft holds the sheet (there’s a hilarious blooper of Benedict falling over in one take). He does take the case; the royal family is being threatened with scandal due to a dominatrix, Irene Adler holding compromising photos on her phone. This is the woman from the start of the episode. Irene receives photos of Sherlock and prepares for his arrival while Sherlock prepares to meet her. He has John punch him in the face (which John always hears when Sherlock is speaking, “but it’s usually subtext”) so he’ll appear suitably distraught to gain entrance to Irene’s residence.

Irene shocks Sherlock by entering the room stark naked. He stumbles a bit and can’t read her like he normally does. She further turns the table and asks Sherlock about his latest case; “brainy is the new sexy” (I totally agree). She eventually dons Sherlock’s coat to make John more comfortable, but they’re ploy to find the phone is interrupted by American CIA agents. They threaten John to make Sherlock open the case (the combination is Irene’s measurements) and with a hint from Irene, Sherlock warns his sidekick “Vatican cameos!” so they all duck as a gun takes out their opponents. Sherlock almost gets away with the phone, but Irene drugs him and escapes. She does return the coat while Sherlock sleeps (and reveals the solution to the case, where a backfiring car covers up a boomerang accidentally killing its owner), and also has now programmed his phone to moan sensually whenever she texts. Which hilariously interrupts Sherlock telling Mycroft off for yelling at Mrs. Hudson to shut up.

This transitions into a Christmas party at Baker Street. Sherlock actually apologizes when he embarrasses Molly Hooper, then his mood turns when he discovers that Irene Adler has left her phone, her insurance policy, for him. He warns Mycroft that they will find the woman dead that evening. He and Mycroft identify the body later that evening. Mycroft even offers Sherlock a cigarette which signals that Sherlock is suffering emotional pain. Sherlock tries to unlock Irene’s phone, but only has four attempts and discovers that if the case is forced, measures are in place to destroy the information. John is picked up while he’s out; he assumes it’s Mycroft again, but really it’s Irene. She’s not dead and she needs her phone back. And…Sherlock is listening. he’s in a bit of a daze as he makes his way back to Baker Street, but then he’s frighteningly focused when he discovers that Mrs. Hudson is in danger. The CIA agents are back. The leader is taken away in an ambulance, after falling out the window, several times. Sherlock declares England would fall is Mrs. Hudson ever left Baker Street.

sherlock and irene

Then he discovers Irene in his bedroom. She has a case for Sherlock. She has an important e-mail she got a hold of that needs decoding. Sherlock manages to crack it in less than a minute. Irene is impressed: “I would have you right here on this desk until you begged for mercy, twice.” Sadly, if we recall, she’s in the league with Moriarty and sends damaging information out. Moriarty contacts Mycroft and Sherlock has just set back a joint operation that could lead to a dangerous group, just to impress a woman. Irene attempts to blackmail Mycroft into her demands, but Sherlock has finally figured out her code to unlock her phone: I AM SHERLOCKED.

This puts Irene in danger. Mycroft visits John later so the man can inform his flatmate that the woman is in witness protection when really she’s dead. However…when we see her send her final text, a phone moans nearby. Sherlock is on hand to save her.

Hounds of Baskerville brings a familiar BBC face to play, Russell Tovey has appeared in Doctor Who and plays George the werewolf in Being Human (I only watched that show because Aidan Turner [Poldark, Kili from the Hobbit, and ironically Luke the werewolf from The Mortal Instruments movie] played Mitchell the vampire). One of the bar owners was Little John in BBC’s Robin Hood series as well. In this episode Russell is the client Henry Knight who witnessed his father murdered as a boy on the moors outside the Baskerville Army installation. He believes he saw a gigantic hound with red eyes tear his father apart. Sherlock is desperate for a case (so desperate, he begs for drugs) and almost doesn’t take it, until Henry specifically says, “it was a gigantic hound.” Hound is a more archaic term, why does he use it?

We get some gorgeous shots of Dartmoor. The consulting detective and his blogger sneak onto the base using Mycroft’s keycard and find a connection to an e-mail a child sent; her mother works for Baskerville, which explains the glowing bunny that shortly afterwards disappeared. So there is something strange going on at Baskerville. Sherlock convinces Henry to take them to Dewer’s Hollow (where the devil supposedly pops up). It’s foggy, they hear rustling. Then Sherlock sees a hound. He denies it to Henry, but John finds him later freaking out. “Once you rule out the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable must be true.” John in turns call Sherlock “Spock” (There is Star Trek trivia that in the fourth movie [not the new ones], Spock quotes that line, claiming one of his ancestors said it, thus connecting Sherlock Holmes and Spock. NuSpock also quotes this line). Sherlock insults John, who goes for a walk.

Come morning, Sherlock apologizes in the way that he does. And another familiar face for him, Lestrade has come, on orders from Mycroft. John muses that it helps with Sherlock’s Asperger’s (I have no way of knowing one way or another if that is a true statement). Sherlock sends John to search the labs and freaks his friend out. Then discovers that the sugar he thought contained the drug does not. He must consult his Mind Palace. Henry had started to remember two words associated with the night his father was killed, “Liberty, In.” Sherlock also realizes that “hound” may actually be an acronym. It is. There was a CIA project years ago codenamed “H.O.U.N.D.” that took place in Liberty, Indiana. It was supposed to be part of chemical warfare and drive the enemy to terror and fear. But it adversely affected the subject and the project was scrapped. But a doctor from that time has started it up again.

Henry, with a gun because he’s starting to see the hound at his place, heads to the Hollow. Sherlock, Lestrade, and John race after him and run into his old family friend, Doctor Franklin, who has worked on the American project. Turns out, what young Henry had seen was Doctor Franklin wearing a gas mask and killing his father. The drug is aerosol form and is hidden in the fog of the hollow. Oh, and there is an actual dog; the pub owners had one that they hoped to capitalize on the tourist craze, but it grew too wild. They claimed to have had it put down; no, they just let it loose in the hollow to terrorize people. Franklin runs to escape prison…into a minefield.

At the very end, Mycroft lets Jim Moriarty leave interrogation, after having written “Sherlock” around his cell.

This leads right into The Reichenbach Fall. Sherlock’s popularity is on the rise, not that he really cares. He’s started solving high profile cases, even receiving the insufferable deerstalker hat as a gag gift from Scotland Yard. Then Moriarty simultaneously breaks into the three most secure places in London, including the Crown Jewels. He goes on trial and Sherlock is called in as a witness. In the loo beforehand, he’s cornered by a “fan,” actually a journalist who wants “the real story” on Sherlock Holmes. He dismisses her. Sherlock deduces afterwards, that Moriarty wanted caught. And he manages to be found not guilty. Jim visits Sherlock at Baker Street and informs his nemesis that the final problem is approaching. Every fairytale needs its villain. Sherlock needs Jim. Mycroft warns John briefly of an upcoming exposé on Sherlock, but more concerning is four assassins moving in nearby.

There is a kidnapping case. Sherlock solves it. But when he goes to visit the girl, she screams at the sight of him. Donovan, alongside Anderson, who have never liked Sherlock, start to believe that he staged the whole thing, just so he could solve it. John knows Sherlock is not a fraud, but Lestrade gets in trouble from his superior and has to come arrest Sherlock. John is offended by the superior and punches him, Sherlock uses it as an opportunity for the two of them to escape. Sherlock tracks down the journalist, who startlingly has a clear history of Sherlock’s childhood and a mysterious source, Jim Moriarty, who claims to be an actor named Richard Brook that Sherlock hired to play his nemesis. I hate this part; I dislike this woman. She got turned down by Sherlock but is so desperate to prove her career that she eagerly laps up a story to explain that he’s an ordinary man. As Sherlock tells John, it’s a lie wrapped up in a truth, so people will believe it.

Sherlock retreats to St. Bart’s and quietly enlists Molly Hooper’s help. She is a kind hearted person and has offered to Sherlock, even after he’s mean to her, that if he ever needs help, she’s there. He trusts her and tells her, she has always counted. “I think I’m going to die,” he tells her. “What do you need?” she simply asks. “You.”

John races off to Baker Street, thinking Mrs. Hudson is in trouble. But she’s fine (aside from an assassin is standing next to her). John then races back to St. Bart’s figuring that Sherlock is planning to face Moriarty alone. The opposing players meet on the roof. Staying Alive plays again and the final problem is that Moriarty has grown bored of Sherlock. Claims he’s ordinary; he’s beaten him. Sherlock retorts to the criminal, “Oh, I may be on the side of the angels, but don’t think for one second that I am one of them” [and he sounds so much like Kahn at that moment.] There was no magic key. He paid off guards, just like he blackmailed the jury. And now, to end his story, Sherlock must die. Sherlock must commit suicide; if he doesn’t, three gunmen are set up to kill John Watson, Greg Lestrade, and Mrs. Hudson. Sherlock thinks for a minute he would be able to get the information out of Moriarty, he figured out that in German, Richard Brook translates to Reichenbach, Sherlock’s fame-making case and he can prove that Jim created a falsesherlock call identity, but the insane man shoots himself in the head. Now Sherlock has no choice. John has arrived on scene; Sherlock makes him stay back. John calls his phone. Sherlock claims he has lied to John the whole time; John does not believe him. Sherlock jumps. John rushes to him, but is first hit by a bicyclist, and then the people won’t let him near Sherlock.

I still tear up at the end when John begs Sherlock for one more miracle, “just, don’t be dead.” John tells Sherlock’s tombstone that he was the best man, the most human person he had ever known and he will never believe that Sherlock was lying. He owes Sherlock so much. The camera follows John as he leaves the cemetery and pans to Sherlock watching.

I enjoy this season more than the first. I like the hour and a half long episodes because it allows the writers time to fully develop a story and delve into nuances.  There’s humor and action mixed in with the mystery and drama.  Sherlock still shows us that he is human and experiences human emotions, as much as he may deny them.  He trusts Molly more than John at the end to help him pull off his suicide.  He recognizes on his own that he hurt John’s feelings at Baskerville.  I wish we had a more satisfying end to Moriarty, and more public, after what he put Sherlock through.  And as Season Two ends, I desperately want to start watching Season Three.

Next Time: Season Three

“Because Sherlock Holmes is a great man, and I think one day, if we’re very, very lucky, he may even be a good one.”

Sherlock – Season One

One of BBC’s incredibly popular shows, despite the fact that there are only three episodes per season and we’ve only had four seasons and one movie in seven years. Made Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman household names (they would team up again as the dragon Smaug, and titular hobbit, Bilbo Baggins in Peter Jackson’s Hobbit trilogy, and as already stated, both appear in the MCU. We’ve seen Benedict briefly in The Other Boleyn Girl and Amazing Grace.) We have become “The Fandom that Waited.” Oh, there’s lots to discuss about the fandom and theories…we’ll cover that in the last post. Created by Mark Gatiss (who also plays Sherlock’s older brother, Mycroft and has appeared in Doctor Who and written a few episodes) and Steven Moffat (an integral writer to Doctor Who since 2005), both of whom are professed Sherlock Holmes fanboys. It’s BBC, so many actors pop up in the show who have been on others.

In A Study in Pink, we’re first introduced to John Watson, a war veteran attending a session with his psychologist, who suggests he keep a blog describing his day. John (they go by first names in this rendition since it’s modern times, compared to Victorian when it was more common to be referred to by surnames) comments, “nothing happens to me.” Going on at the same time, Scotland Yard is investigating a string of suicides that are connected, but they’re unsure how, since they’re suicides. Detective Inspector Lestrade heads the case and gets texts during a press conference, the last one saying “you know where to find me. SH.” John runs into an old friend, who remarks who knows someone else in need of a flatmate. Then we’re introduced to Molly Hooper, who plainly has a crush on Sherlock and does favors for him in the mortuary, like, letting him whip a corpse for a science experiment. Stamford brings about John to meet Sherlock, Sherlock easily deduces John’s purpose, and finally introduces himself on camera: “the name is Sherlock Holms and the address is 221B Backer Street.”

sherlock intro

John follows Sherlock on his case, telling his potential flatmate that yes, he would like to see more trouble. “The game, Mrs. Hudson, is on!” Sherlock pronounces as they sweep out of the flat. We discover that most of the police force dislike Sherlock, some even calling him a freak to his face. One officer, Donovan, warns John that Sherlock is a psychopath and one day, the body they discover will have been put there by Sherlock. Sherlock has already raced off for more clues and John starts to make his way back to the center of town, though pay phones keep ringing as he goes by. He eventually answers and is picked up by a car and meets a mysterious man, well dressed in a suit and carrying an umbrella. The man claims to be Sherlock’s arch enemy, the closest thing a man like Sherlock has to friends. He worries about him and offers to pay John to pass along information. The man deduces that John is not traumatized by the war, like his psychologist suggests; he misses it. His hand does not shake when in stressful situations. John receives a text from Sherlock: “come at once if convenient, if inconvenient, come all the same. Could be dangerous.” John turns down the offer and gets dropped off at 221B.

Sherlock has found the missing pink suitcase so he can carry on with the case; there is also an absolutely hilarious conversation between the two men on dating. John asserts he is not gay and the subject doesn’t seem to interest Sherlock (oh boy, fans play around with this a lot). They do grab some dinner (well, not really. Sherlock doesn’t eat and they’re off chasing a cab before John can eat. He does leave his cane) and ultimately arrive back at Baker Street to find a drugs’ bust going on in their flat, conducted by Lestrade. Lestrade needs Sherlock to cooperate (and we, along with John, find out that Sherlock may have illicit drugs in his possession, though he seems to use cases as a way to get high instead). Sherlock corrects Anderson of forensics “I am not a psychopath, Anderson, I’m a high-functioning sociopath, do your research.” Then later yells at Anderson while he’s trying to unlock clues: “Anderson, don’t talk out loud, you lower the IQ of the whole street,” and tells everyone to shut up and has Anderson turn his back. He silently leaves with a waiting cabbie, who is apparently the serial killer. John tracks him but ends up in the building next to where Sherlock is engaged with the killer. The killer simply gives what he considers a 50-50 chance to his victims, two bottles, with identical pills, they just have to figure out if he’s placed the good or bad bottle in front of them. Sherlock is ready to play the game, particularly intrigued when the killer mentions he has a sponsor who is very interested in Sherlock. He pries a name out of the man after John shoots him: Moriarty.

The wrap-up is a bit funny, the police keep putting a shock blanket on Sherlock and he starts to rattle off his deductions on who shot the serial killer, until he realizes it was John. Then he tells Lestrade to ignore everything he’s just said, “I’m in shock, look, I’ve got a blanket.” Sherlock meets up with his new flatmate and thanks him. They giggle a bit, which they really shouldn’t do, but are stopped by the well dressed man John met earlier. Nope, not Moriarty like we might have first guessed, it’s his elder brother, Mycroft. He really does worry about his brother. He remarks to his P.A. that John Watson could be the making of his brother, or make him worse.

The second episode, Blind Banker manages to tie a Chinese crime syndicate to mysterious graffiti in an international bank and the murder of a stock tradesman. Turns out the tradesman, along with a journalist and I’m sure many others, acted as couriers to smuggle stolen artifacts out of China to sell at auction for huge profit. All involved with the Black Lotus syndicate are tattooed on the bottom of their foot and communicate with an ancient Chinese cipher involving a book, which turned out to be London A to Z. John and Sherlock get some help from a young woman who works at the museum. John starts to see a young woman when he gets a side job as a physician; Sherlock tags along on their date to the Chinese circus, which acts as a cover for the syndicate. John’s girlfriend, Sarah, is kidnapped alongside John because he was mistaken for Sherlock (he had been mocking his friend earlier and was overheard). Sherlock rescues them, though the leader gets away. Not for long; she’s tied into the organization with Moriarty.

In The Great Game, Sherlock is given a series of cases to solve, with an innocent life at stake with each one. It’s all kicked off with a bombing across the street from 221B. And Mycroft needs a case solved involving missile plans. When Lestrade calls Sherlock in, he remarks “I’d be lost without my blogger,” and encourages John to come. The first case calls upon the pink phone from their first case (John’s blog is more highly read than they realized) and has pictures from the other flat at 221 Baker and shoes from the first case Sherlock tried to solve. He ultimately solves the case so a innocent person won’t be blown up.

The second case involves a bloody car and ultimately a cover-up for someone to disappear. The third case is about a celebrity’s death. Sadly, the old woman who was the in-between for Sherlock and the mastermind is killed; she was blind and wouldn’t be able to read a text and so she started to describe the mystery man’s voice and was killed in an explosion. John works Mycroft’s case while Sherlock is busy. The fourth case involves a new painting that a gallery has procured which is actually a fake. It’s down to the wire and a kid’s life is on the line before Sherlock realizes the painting included an astrological event that hadn’t occurred at that time.

sherlock meets jim

There’s still one case left: Mycroft’s. The brother to the fiancé of the man who was killed did it on accident and hoped to cover it up. Sherlock intends to meet the bomber at a local pool; then John steps out. He’s wired up and there’s a sniper to keep things on track. (Sherlock dear, please do not scratch your head while holding a loaded gun!) Then Molly’s boyfriend Jim, whom Sherlock commented was gay, steps out. His surname is Moriarty and he’s a specialist, just like Sherlock. While Sherlock is a consulting detective, Moriarty is a consulting criminal. And he doesn’t want to kill Sherlock yet, that wouldn’t be fun. He’s saving that for something special. No, if Sherlock doesn’t stop prying, Jim will “burn you. I will burn the heart out of you.” Jim strolls off. “Catch you later,” Sherlock says in farewell. “No you won’t!” Jim calls back. But Jim does come back, “I’m so changeable,” it’s his only weakness. He cannot let Sherlock and John live. Red sniper dots hover on Sherlock and John and Sherlock aims at the bomb vest as the music crescendos, Sherlock and Jim face off, building tension…and…black. Cliff hanger!

The acting is superb in this show. At the end, oh, we hate Moriarty, but we want to know what he does next…the cliffhanger only encourages us more. He’s all laid back and la-la-la, then shouts “that’s what people do!” when Sherlock mentions people have died as a result of the game Jim Moriarty has played with Sherlock.

While Sherlock flaps about showing off his intelligence and spouting that he is a sociopath and doesn’t have friends, he clearly has come to care quickly for John Watson. There’s a brief look of horror on his face when it’s John who steps out at the pool. For a moment, we and Sherlock wonder, was John only playing at being Sherlock’s friend? Was it all a set up? And then, Sherlock is anxious to get the bomb vest off his friend and save his life. He calls John an idiot only so much that everyone who is not Sherlock is an idiot. Yes, he doesn’t understand all the social niceties, but we still want to see him succeed. He comments to Jim at the pool, “I have been reliably informed that I don’t have one [a heart].” “Oh, we both know that’s not true,” Jim replies.

John is the audience, quite impressed by Sherlock and willing to take him under his wing and try to acclimatize him to proper society, because he finds the cases thrilling as well. He’s only just met the strange man, but refuses to take bribe money to spy on him. (Of course, Sherlock remarks that John should have accepted the offer and they could have split the money; because Sherlock knows it’s Mycroft.)

Personally, I highly recommend the show. I like the inclusion of modern technology to keep with the times. It makes me think, because I’m trying to solve the case and the twist, but I also know that Sherlock will solve it in the end.

Next Time: Season Two

One Year In

It has been one year since I began posting blogs. I have over sixty posts (I’ve managed that despite taking a month off here and there due to often posting twice a week). That number staggers me at times, because I have barely scratched the surface of my eclectic love of movies. Yes, we’ve done Disney. But I love musicals as well. And action movies. And movie series. I’ve planned out the next couple of months, about until I may break for the holiday season. And I’ve only gotten two categories laid out and doing some rough math…oh boy, there’s still more coming! I originally thought this would be a project for a year. Nope, gonna be more like three. Wow!

After Eragon, we will continue with historic movies, then historic-set romances. Some more modern romances or rom coms (not a long category). Musicals (that’s gonna be a big group). Action/adventure, always fun. The superheroes, including the Marvel cinematic universe. And the pieces that I really want to discuss: Star Wars, Lord of the Rings/Hobbit, Chronicles of Narnia, How to Train Your Dragon, Harry Potter; those expansive series.

In the meantime, enjoy a quick update on some other movies I fit into my life.

Since I got into Game of Thrones and came to love the character Jon Snow the best, I decided to try some of Kit Harington’s other movies. So far, I’ve seen Testament of Youth and Pompeii. Both of which I want to own. I don’t want to give too much away and I know they may not be widely liked films, but I enjoyed them. Well, the second half of Testament of Youth not too much; it made me cry. But it takes place during the First World War, so you can guess why. But Kit’s character is a dashing, charming young man who likes literature and poetry and my heart melts. I’d love a happier tale, of a young lady falling in love with her brother’s friend; that doesn’t end in heartbreak. I should see if more exist. That part reminded me a bit of Jane Austen. And the lead female character is at Oxford. Me being the nerd that I am, was fairly drooling looking at the library. And realizing this takes place at the same time as Tolkien (brilliant movie, I want it as soon as it’s available. We’ll cover it once we get to the two trilogies).

I was surprised I liked Pompeii; as disaster movies are not my cup of tea. The storyline is not the most original, but it was well done. The action is stupendous and Kiefer Sutherland is surprisingly in it; they timed the opening credits well so his name comes up just as he turns around and you realize, oh, that’s him. This made me want to watch Gladiator. And I was disappointed. I dozed off half an hour into the movie and towards the end, I was fast forwarding, begging it to get to the point. What is a bit frustrating is that I like other Ridley Scott films. And I deeply enjoyed his film starring Russell Crowe again in Robin Hood.

If anyone has any suggestions or recommendations on movies or shows to watch, I will consider. I am in no way promising to watch, partly due to, as I’ve stated previously, I am into enough shows and movies and fandoms as it is. My bookshelves plead with me to return to my first love.

And a thank you to all the followers and all the people who have read this blog! I didn’t realize I would enjoy it the way that I do. It combines my love of movies (and talking about movies, because I find them fascinating) and writing. Happy movie watching and happy reading!

fun movies
Look what was waiting for me when I got home! (The first movie will be covered during the “historic” segment)

The Story We Have Been a Part of, Will Live Long in the Minds of Men

Merlin – Season 5

We’ve come to the end of the series. I feel they rushed this series; maybe they were surprised how quick they would have to wrap things up. My one friend came back and asked me where the season was that they end up in modern times, since she had seen pictures of it everywhere (I can find them on Pintrest, maybe they’re on Tumblr; I’m not on Tumblr, I don’t know). Sadly, no, that’s not how this season ends. I feel that they should come back and do that season, or a movie at the very least.

Arthur’s Bane, begins the season in two parts. Three years have passed since Guinevere’s coronation. Arthur meets with his knights at the Round Table. Unfortunately, Gwaine and Percival are missing after an expedition. Morgana is suspected, even though they haven’t heard from her in the three years. Morgana is indeed behind the disappearances; she’s capturing men to work searching for the key to the knowledge of Arthur’s Bane, his downfall. Joined by Liam Cunningham whose character isn’t named until the second episode. (Since I’ve been wandering down the Game of Thrones path, when I saw his name in the opening credits I was surprised. I haven’t seen this season as often as the previous ones, so a lot of this was unfamiliar to me.) Arthur and his knights, and Merlin, go looking for their brethren. Merlin receives a vision that Arthur is in danger and even Gwen worries about Arthur going on the mission himself; he is Camelot’s king, he needs to be cautious. But Arthur is the type of king who will show his people he is not afraid of any task.

Sadly, Gwen’s new maid who is adorable with Merlin is also a traitor, for her father who is harboring Morgana. Her father (played by Liam Cunningham) ultimately rescues his daughter, but also dies in the aftermath. Morgana doesn’t seem particularly bothered, more concerned with the overarching search for Arthur’s destruction. Arthur is injured on their quest and he and Merlin are captured by Saxons, and a familiar looking young man. Mordred is back and now a young man (don’t think too hard on what ages they look). He shows Arthur and Merlin kindness even though Merlin does not trust him. Arthur saved his life as a child and he will repay that debt. Arthur and Merlin manage to escape and sneak into the castle where they find Percival.

Gwaine has been missing for a few days. An alien-looking being (really BBC? Let’s bring aliens into the mix) finds him and heals him after guards beat him. (And they’re all shirtless for no apparent reason. Again, does BBC really need to do this to attract viewers?) Percival starts gathering men and taking out the guards. Morgana comes across Arthur while Merlin is chasing after Aithusa. Mordred is with her and prevents her from killing Arthur. He recognizes that Morgana has gone a bit crazy; she has chosen hate. He has not. He carries Arthur to his knights. Merlin finds Gwaine and the creature. He is granted one question. Who is Arthur’s Bane? Himself.

Everyone is back in Camelot; Arthur knights Mordred. Merlin honestly likes Mordred, but doesn’t trust him. He asks why Mordred saved Arthur. “Because he’s right, the love that binds us is more important than the power we wield.” Merlin knows that for good or ill, the die is cast. Albion’s greatest trial has begun.

The Death Song of Uther Pendragon brings to light Arthur’s doubts whether he is being a good ruler. He does a lot of things his father wouldn’t approve of. He’s then gifted a chance to see his father again when he saves an old sorceress for a horrible death and no trial. And Uther is disappointed with his son. He knighted commoners, he married a commoner and not for an alliance for the kingdom. He feels that his son has failed to strengthen and protect the kingdom; he’s destroying Uther’s legacy. Meanwhile, we, along with Merlin, counsel Arthur that he is better than his father. His people love and respect him and his is a more wise and just ruler. But Uther’s spirit is released and haunts the castle. Percival is attacked. Gwen is almost killed. Merlin and Arthur set out to put Uther’s spirit back. Uther attacks Merlin and discovers that he has magic. Uther tries to warn Arthur, but Arthur sounds the horn dismissing the spirit before he is able.

Mithian’s kingdom is attacked, bringing her back to Camelot in Another’s Sorrow. It’s a ploy between Odin and Morgana. Morgana disguises herself as Mithian’s maidservant so Mithian will persuade Arthur to rescue her father. Merlin suspects the maid and discovers it is Morgana, but she knocks him out before he can warn Arthur. Arthur proceeds with the plan and walks into the trap. Merlin comes to, with magical aid from Gaius, in time to take Gawine and rescue Arthur. Arthur faces Odin and Merlin prevents his friend from killing the other king. There is a better way. Arthur asks for a truce; else, their blood feud will simply continue on. Odin accepts. And we start a trend this season of seeing Merlin injured more often. I think it’s good, because it shows that he is vulnerable and we like vulnerability in our heroes.

The Disir, the mouthpiece of the Triple Goddess, pass judgment on Arthur and find him lacking. He has persecuted sorcerers as a carryover from Uther. His fate is set; while Camelot flowers, already the seeds of its destruction are sown. Arthur argues he makes his own path, but he still wants to protect his people, so he appears before the Disir. He is not respectful the first appearance though and they attack. Mordred takes a spear meant for Arthur. Arthur now has a choice; to save Mordred, he must allow magic to be freely practiced in Camelot again. If not, Mordred dies. We can see Merlin struggle to advise his friend. Merlin desires for magic to return, for his sake and his people. But even Kilgarah warns him that Arthur’s fate is bound with Mordred. So Merlin tells Arthur there is no place for magic in Camelot, thereby sentencing Mordred to die. Yet when they return to Camelot, Mordred lives. This gets terribly confusing for Merlin; every step he takes toward not bring the future to pass actually helps it along.

Morgana kidnaps Gwen in The Dark Tower and tortures her in a way. She locks her former maidservant in a dark room with mandrake root, listening to screams, and seeing visions of people she loves. Elyan and Arthur mount a rescue attempt, though they are waylaid in a magical forest. Merlin trusts his magic and leads them out, but Elyan darts ahead to rescue his sister. An enchanted sword runs him through. At the very end of the episode, we see Gwen sneak out to visit Morgana. She now believes that only Morgana has her best interest at heart; after all, they were close friends for many years, they know each other best.

Gwen begins to work behind the scenes to help Morgana and bring down Camelot and kill her husband. Accidents begin to befall Arthur in A Lesson in Vengeance. (Yes, the stable hand is played by John Bradley, who plays Samwell Tarly in Game of Thrones. And due to when this season was filmed, he had already begun playing Sam. So we are correct to gasp, “Oh my gosh, it’s Sam!”) The stable hand Tyr Seward takes the fall and Gwen stabs him to prevent him from talking. Morgana gives Gwen a magical poison to slowly and painfully kill Arthur. She has no hesitation in giving it to Arthur; she plays her part as grieving wife well. Gwen next arranges for Merlin to take the fall; he’s close to Arthur and has access to cause him harm. Gaius helps Merlin out of the cell while Leon pledges the knights to follow Gwen who will succeed Arthur should he die. Merlin ages himself (we can see he is having a lot of fun in his Dragoon character). Only Merlin’s magic can save Arthur, but he doubts he has the strength for both the aging and the healing. Gaius informs his ward that the only one who doubts Merlin’s abilities is Merlin. Merlin cries when he thinks Arthur has died, but Arthur survives. Merlin sneaks back into his cell so he can be released the next day. Arthur never suspected Merlin. Well that’s good, but why didn’t the knights stand up for him? Gwen gets the credit when she finds a new suspect and pins the blame correctly on Morgana.

Arthur meets with potential allies in The Hollow Queen while Gwen arranges a distraction for Merlin. A “Druid” boy sneaks into Camelot and asks Merlin for help. He leads Merlin into a trap by Morgana (she and Gwen are just trying to get Arthur’s biggest defense away while Gwen arranges for Arthur’s assassination). She poisons Merlin and throws him into a ravine. The boy returns for Merlin; the young man had shown him kindness and helps Merlin heal. They make it back to Camelot just as the assassin sets up. The boy is killed helping Merlin. Gwen had fed Arthur the tale that Merlin was sneaking off to see a girl when Arthur began to worry about Merlin. Now Gaius and Merlin know that Gwen is working against them.

They come up with a solution in With All My Heart. Merlin helps Arthur spy on Gwen when she meets with Morgana. They know it’s Morgana’s magic this time betraying Arthur. Which means it will take even more powerful magic to undo the spell. Merlin gets the solution off of an old sorceress and must lead Arthur to a magical lake and summon the White Goddess. Gwen must enter the lake of her own will. Arthur and Merlin sneak Gwen out of the castle, keeping her unconscious. Mordred follows them, which was a good thing because both Merlin and Arthur fall off a cliff and Arthur’s arm is pinned. Merlin has to transform into an old woman so as to not arouse suspicion merlin dolma(though Mordred does note that Merlin is missing at one point). The magic works and Dolma (Merlin in disguise) asks that Arthur remembers that magic can save, as well as hurt. “She” tells him off when they almost forget Merlin and tells Arthur “one day, he will recognize the true worth of those around him.” Mordred finally realizes that Merlin has magic, but promises to keep his secret. They share the dream of magic returning to Camelot.

Alator returns in The Kindness of Strangers; Morgana has hunted him down and tortures him to reveal Emrys’s identity. He refuses, but has recruited others to his cause. An old woman warns Merlin that the great battle is approaching. Mordred and the other knights give chase when they discover the old woman, since Gaius does not trust her. She is not in league with Morgana, but Morgana finds out about her, so she too is hunting for the woman. Merlin goes to help and is injured. The woman sacrifices herself to protect Merlin and he is not discovered. He hears the prophecy of Camlan and receives word that Morgana has declared war.

A familiar face for us pops up in The Drawing of the Dark. Alexandra Dowling (Roslin Frey in Game of Thrones and Queen Anne of Austria in Musketeers) is Kara, an old friend [and love interest] of Mordred’s. She’s injured and Mordred tends to her in the woods. Merlin finds out, but Mordred swears him to secrecy. Arthur and Merlin discover Kara themselves, even after Merlin tries to lure Arthur away. Kara attacks Arthur and is arrested. She proudly defies the king; “I will not rest until you are dead and your kingdom is no more.” Mordred pleads for her life, but she shows no repentance. Arthur cannot risk her being free. Merlin even pleads on Mordred’s behalf, but Arthur believes Mordred will see that Arthur had no choice and eventually forgive him. Merlin suspects that Mordred will try to free Kara, Mordred throws in Merlin’s face, “wouldn’t you do the same for a woman you love?” We know that Merlin tried, but Arthur killed Freya when she attacked Camelot. And Merlin forgave Arthur and serves him faithfully to this day. Merlin does not tell Mordred this (there is a fanfiction story Love Lost by Revhead where Merlin does tell Mordred and changes the story a little).

Mordred breaks Kara out, she kills a guard along the way, but they’re captured. Arthur offers her one last chance, but she will not change her ways. Mordred is in a cell when she is led to her execution. His magic breaks him out of his cell and he goes directly to Morgana. He has information for her, which will lead to Arthur’s death. He knows the identity of Emrys: Merlin.

The Diamond of the Day completes the season in two parts. Morgana sends a mook into Camelot to sneak into Merlin’s chambers, planting some sort of slug. It attacks Merlin’s face and somehow steals his magic. While that happens, Morgana and Mordred attack on outpost. Gwaine rescues a young woman and they make it back to Camelot to give word. Arthur decides to ride out and meet Morgana and her army on the field, to keep the fighting away from the people and other villages. The best place is Camlan, where the path narrows. Merlin sadly cannot accompany Arthur on this great battle; he must secretly journey to the Crystal Cave in an effort to restore his magic. But Gwaine’s new friend is a spy for Morgana, she passes along the information about Arthur and Mordred surmises where Merlin is heading. Morgana is waiting for the warlock and causes a cave in.

Merlin is injured and when he wakes, he sees his father. Balinor urges his son to not let go, don’t give in. Merlin is magic itself; he cannot lose what he is. Rest, he advises, believe in the crystals. When Merlin wakes again, he is healed and sees a secret path that Mordred plans to cut Arthur off with. Merlin warns Arthur in a dream, then bursts out of the cave.

Arthur misses having Merlin with him; the man who has stood beside him in every other instance is now gone for this vital confrontation. Gwen has accompanied him, not to fight, though she will help behind the scenes, but so they can spend what time they have together. She knows there is a good chance that Arthur may not return from this battle. Arthur receives Merlin’s message (Gwen has already begun to suspect there is more to Merlin that appears) and sets the camp to business. Percival and Gwaine will meet the band coming around behind. Arthur rallies his troops; fight for a united kingdom, fight against tyranny. The battle has begun.

Aithusa spews fire on Arthur’s troop, but a sorcerer (an aged Merlin, his true Emrys form) calls him off, then directs lightning on the Saxons, saving Arthur. He knocks Morgana down. Mordred hunts down Arthur on the field and stabs him with a blade forged on Aithusa’s breath. Arthur kills Mordred. Merlin finds Arthur on the field, bypassing Mordred, and carries him off.

When Arthur wakes, Merlin is back to his normal form. Merlin apologizes to his friend; he thought he was in time to defy the prophecy. Arthur doesn’t know what Merlin is talking about. Merlin reveals he was the sorcerer.

Arthur…doesn’t take it well. He responds to Gaius, when the old man finds them, but shies away from Merlin. They need to get word back to Guinevere in Camelot. Leon is giving her updates; but they have not found Arthur. Gaius tells Arthur that Merlin is his friend; he needs him far more than he needs Gaius. The wound is fatal, due to the blade. The only place Arthur could heal is the Isle of Avalon. Gaius can take the royal seal to Gwen.

Back in Camelot, they realize that truth of Gwaine’s traitorous female friend. She is executed, after passing along misinformation to Morgana. Percival and Gwaine set out to take down Morgana. Sadly, she bests them, knocking out Percival, then torturing Gwaine. Percival frees himself in time to watch his friend die. And so starts the “how many stabs does it take to kill Morgana?” Gwen confronts Gaius about the truth of Merlin. She seems pleased and knows that Merlin will care for Arthur.

Merlin continues to care for Arthur, confusing the man. Arthur slowly comes around to the fact that his manservant has had magic all along, but it still takes time for him to get over the fact that Merlin lied about it the whole time he knew Arthur. Merlin insists, it has always been to help Arthur; he is proud of what he has done and he wouldn’t change a thing. Arthur finally apologizes for the way he has treated Merlin. Morgana finds them just as the reach the shore of the lake. Merlin faces her and stabs her with Excalibur. That does her in. He has brought peace at last to Albion. But Arthur is fading fast. “It’s too late,” he tells the young warlock and asks his friend to hold him in his final moments, and says what he has never said before: “Thank you.” We cry alongside Merlin.

merlin and arthur in the end
Pardon my blubbering

Merlin calls Kilgarah one last time to carry them to the Isle. But it is too late, the dragon tells his young friend. Fear not, he has not failed. All that he has dreamt has come to pass. “I can’t lose him! He’s my friend!” Merlin cries. Some lives are foretold, Kilgarah counsels. Arthur is the Once and Future King. When Albion’s need is greatest, Arthur will rise again. Merlin throws Excalibur into the lake, caught by a hand. Again, we cry alongside Merlin as he lays Arthur to rest in a boat and sends it to Avalon. Gwen is crowned queen; Leon, Gaius, and Percival are alongside her in Camelot. The parting shot of the show is a truck passing the tower on the Isle of Avalon and an old man, Emrys, walks along the side of the road.

Gosh, the last two episodes hurt. Part of me expected, hoped, that it would turn out different than legend, that Arthur and Merlin would work together and see the fruits of their labors. There is a chance that Gwen was carrying Arthur’s child at the end, maybe the writers threw in her accompanying Arthur to the camp in order for that to be a possibility. I have no doubt she made a just and wise ruler, but it’s not the same as if Arthur would have been around. Yes, it’s a deviation from legend, but I prefer a happy ending where heroes get some peace and quiet and rewards. You make us love these characters and then you separate them. We have no idea if Merlin even returned to Camelot, or just stayed away. (Check out fanfics, we’ve got lots of ideas. And fixes!)

Heck, I was even beginning to hope that Mordred would turn out alright. Again, doesn’t follow legend, though I like how they wrote around the incest nature of Mordred. And Merlin’s reveal has so little time to sink in. (Again, check out fanfics!) I would have preferred at least another season to the show. Again, I think they were surprised at when they had to wrap and had to bring about so much to end it, it all ended up rushed. Did not like Gwen’s storyline for several episodes. You’ve already done the “Gwen is a threat to Camelot.” They keep her a good character since none of it is her actual fault, she’s always influenced by Morgana. Still haven’t gotten over her turn and sudden descent into madness. “Oh, I’m a witch, so I must turn evil.” I don’t buy it. Never bought that mentality. (That is why my female characters who have magical powers are good. Well, they fight bad ones, but they’re still good after wielding phenomenal power).

I still like the show and I love the portrayal of characters, most specifically the relationship between Arthur and Merlin. Banter is my favorite. Yes, they insult each other, but they genuinely care for each other and they see that, even though they don’t say it (until the end and that makes us cry). I just wish it had ended different. Please, BBC, do a movie!

Next Time: Continuing a bit with fantasy type movies, Knight’s Tale (Well, it fits with the medieval setting).

I Know Nothing

I finally gave in. I have now seen all of Game of Thrones; I managed in about a week and a half, though considering I started on Memorial Day and had the day off and there are only ten episodes at most per season…this is also coming from the young lady who managed to catch up on nine seasons of Supernatural in about a month. When I get hooked on something, I get hooked.

My best friend lent me the DVDs of Seasons One and Two (about a year ago) and I kept meaning to watch them. Circumstances came along that I thought I’d give them a try. I had previously watched the first episode and thus was a bit wary. The rampant nudity, sex, and gore are not to my taste. I figured at the very least I could use it as inspiration as to what I didn’t want to happen in my own series. But I was going to stick it out. And in that respect it has been helpful, crafting my own characters in how they would respond to situations and what sort of elements I may actually want. By the end of season one, I was popping in the first disc for season two. As I was wrapping that season up, I was debating how I was going to watch the rest of the show. And luckily, it was available on demand. While some of the plot points and storylines are not my favorite and as a writer, I would have done things differently (no, haven’t read the books…yet)…okay, let me rephrase; I think there was a less graphic way to tell the story. And while I do like to torture my characters…not that much.

I’m still surprised I liked the show. About midway through season one, I was thinking, “how do my friends like this? There’s so much violence and how can the women stand seeing all those nude scenes?” Then, as with other series I’ve come to love, I want to know what happens. Maybe not for everyone, but I quickly came to care for certain characters. And yes, I concur with many fans that the last two seasons were not the best. But that often happens with series in my experience; the middle seasons tend to be the best honestly; they’ve built the world and situation and the characters have a chance to grow. Then things get complicated when it’s time to wrap it up.

Before I proceed further, just in case you have not had a chance to see the last season yet, be cautious of spoilers. And now, what you probably all are interested in and what every fan debates: what do I think of so-and-so or a specific episode or what happened, etc, etc, etc.

Stark family
House Stark: Bran, Arya, Sansa, Robb, Ned, Catelyn (you can just see Jon Snow behind her), and Rickon

My favorite episode of Season One is the very first; “Winter is Coming.” Watching the episode again after the series finale makes me want to cry at points; seeing everyone happy. Watching Jon say goodbye to family members he’ll never see again. Him hugging Arya. I chuckled when Jon got to the Wall and just handily beats any of the other recruits. He’s barely trying. Ned tries through season one to do the honorable thing, but he doesn’t know how to play the game. Heck, I hate the game; and this is why I hate politics. When Ned dies in the penultimate episode, I was too shocked to cry the first time; even though I knew it was coming (also, it fits with the joke that he dies in everything). Poor Sansa, having to witness it and plead for her father. Arya is luckily spared the actual sight, but I can tell her journey is only just beginning.

By Season Two I was more closely following the story of Jon Snow. The backstabbing of King’s Landing continued to annoy me; more for a want to beat them all with a stick and make them behave like proper people. I was a bit horrified at the effects of Wildfire. I cheered for Tyrion to lead the men. And then Cersei was the cruel person she always is.jon snow and ygritte Season Three is when I really started liking the show. I found Jon’s interactions with the wildlings interesting and was entranced by his relationship with Ygritte, especially “Kissed by Fire” and afterwards. I did remark that Jon Snow was a stupid boy when he left her. “I didn’t have a choice,” well, you could have chosen to take her with you. Glad he didn’t die though. And Bran and Rickon were so close to Jon!! Gah! Wouldn’t have helped Jon any, but I just want their family back together. Jamie underwent some good character growth, I think Brienne is good for him. She’s not my favorite character, just due to being stuffy most of the time. I was rendered shocked and speechless the first time I saw the Red Wedding. I didn’t cry. Now, I don’t watch because I know I’ll cry. Horrible. Simply horrible. And Arya was so close! I had hoped that she would reunite with her family then, though it was good that she didn’t. Hurray for the Hound for getting her out of there, though she had to see her brother’s mutilation. I agree with her idea of stabbing them, maybe not so gory.

Season Four I enjoy for the Jon storyline. My favorite episode of the whole show is “The Watchers on the Wall.” I enjoy a good fight sequence (one of the reasons I will repeatedly watch Lord of the Rings. And parts of the second How to Train Your Dragon movie). Jon kicks butt!! Woo! And then I was heartbroken when Ygritte died. I hoped for a minute…and Olly ruined it. That’s probably when I started to not like the boy. Tywin is still horrible. Jamie continues to show a good character arc; I like his interactions with Tyrion. They’re true brothers and just shows Tyrion that his whole family doesn’t hate him and Jamie is trying to get out from under the thumb of Cersei. Honestly, Arya should have gone with Brienne. I understand why she didn’t, but I was hoping. And again, she was so close to meeting up with Jon! And so close to Sansa and didn’t know it.

Season Five continued to be good for the most part. I still want Arya anywhere but where the Faceless Man is. I’ve never trusted Melisandre and the first time I cried for the show was when she burned poor Shireen. The religious order that takes over King’s Landing can go crawl back into whatever hole it sprang out of. I did feel genuinely sad when Myrcella died; she was innocent, sweetly in love with her prince and had nothing to do with her mother’s plots. As a loyal follower of Jon Snow, I agree that saving the Free Folk was the right thing to do with the White Walkers pressing down on them. He made a good Lord Commander and this is why heroes always need a Sam. And I believed Olly the first time through, when he said Benjen Stark had returned. Then I gasped alongside Jon when Thorne shoved a dagger into him. And I cried (even though I knew Jon was in later seasons; on the one hand, a drawback to watching the show after everyone else, you don’t get to be fully surprised. On the other hand, not quite as stressful). And immediately started Season Six.

Still don’t trust Melisandre, but at least she brought Jon back. I cheered for the few men who stood alongside Jon and aw, those hugs afterwards. Favorite scene from season six is Sansa’s and Jon’s reunion. Finally, two Starks are back together! Now, go get the other game-thrones-battle-bastardsones. The Battle of the Bastards was epic (I’ve watched some of the behind-the-scenes bits and yes, I agree very cool, it will personally never top Lord of the Rings for me). Gotta say though, that the production team does an excellent job; they’re pulling out battles that would be the centerpiece of a two-three hour movie for an hour-long show. It was a bit terrifying when Jon was almost buried alive. Yeah, the ending, Ramsay, you had that coming. You killed Jon’s baby brother mere feet from him, yes, he will pound you to a pulp and we will sit back and cheer. Sansa was poetic in her justice. I cheered when Jon became King of the North. Lyanna Mormont is an awesome young woman. Theon has redeemed himself by rescuing Sansa, hurrah. The flashbacks to a young Ned Stark are endearing. I want to hug Arya and drag her back to Winterfell. I silently cheered when she hid Needle when she was ridding herself of her old identity, silently pleading, “Jon gave it to you.” Cersei has finally lost it, blowing up a holy building. That was the real turning point in the storyline that almost turned me from the show, aside from I wanted to find out what happened to Jon and his siblings. Cersei can go rot. But hey, if those Sparrows or whoever hadn’t shown up, probably wouldn’t have happened.

My dislike for Daenerys hiked with her initial treatment of Jon in Season Seven. Lady, there are more important things going on in the world than someone calling you “Your Grace.” I object to Jon’s decision to bend the knee, but I can’t hate him too much because once again, he’s trying to save lives. The battle beyond the wall was intense; they keep a tight grasp on my heart, putting Jon in danger constantly. Sad to see a dragon go and horrified to see it with blue eyes. Finding out that Jon is actually the son of Lyanna Stark and Rhaegar Targaryen was a bit of a shock (though, I had read a few things ahead, so I had a feeling). The Targaryen family tree confuses me, trying to remember whom is whom and related to whom. Though, cheers to Gilly for actually being the one to discover the loophole, that Rhaegar had annulled his previous marriage. Sam, you should give your wife some credit.

We have come to the point where, if you haven’t seen the final season, feel free to skip down to “The Maesters…”

I noted that when Jon and Daenerys ride into Winterfell in the Season Eight opening, the music playing is “The King’s Arrival,” which was used all the way back in the first episode when King Robert arrived in Winterfell. Hurrah, Baleish is dead! Hurrah, Arya and Jon are reunited and I want to cry. Wish Bran acted like himself. Sansa admittedly makes a good ruler and I kind of like how she dislikes Danerys, mainly on behalf of her brother. And I actually cheer that Jon attempts to steer clear of her once he finds out their relation. The battle was epic and Arya was awesome! And that duel earlier against Brienne was also cool! Gosh, cried during the funerals, but I adore the scene afterwards when everyone is celebrating. Love that kind of thing and Tormund is hilarious and adorable. Thought we were going to lose him last season beyond the wall.

And here it comes; I dislike the last two episodes. Now, would I ever sign a petition or even seriously suggest that the writers re-do them? No. I side with the cast that the crew put in a lot of work and we should not ask more. Should it have been written better from the beginning? Yes. But too late now. However, that is why fanfiction exists! Cersei should have run when she had the chance. Cersei actually should have done a lot of things different for a while. I think the death of Joffrey started her downslide. The Hound and Mountain battle was gruesome. Tyrion crying for his siblings was heartbreaking. I kept wanting Arya to find Jon. And poor Jon, his men turning into raging monsters. Never been fond of Grey Worm and his actions in the city clinched that. Jon killing Daenerys was noble and I feel bad that he was the one who had to do it. Grey Worm left, goody. I hate that Jon was banished. He’s the King of the North and sacrificed so much and he’s thanked by being sent to the tundra. I cried more when Jon left Ghost to go South then other characters’ deaths, and was so happy they were ultimately reunited. Arya shouldn’t have left. Yay, she gets adventure, but I feel her family still needs her. Sansa will rule fairly, but she’ll be made kinder if she has her siblings around. The ending political debate was a bit funny between characters that we’ve come to admire.

The Maesters as a whole turn out to be a bunch of gross old men who stick their heads in the sand. Maester Amon at the Night’s Watch was cool and I felt bad when he died Maester Luwin from Winterfell was kind of cool too. I dislike heavy religious overtones and the whole bit with the militant Religion of the Seven (or whatever) honestly pissed me off. When someone becomes so self righteous…

I feel bad for the Night’s Watch. They have a noble purpose but have been degraded so much. Slynt was horrible, deserved to die, most especially for his dereliction of duty during the battle at Castle Black. After he puffed himself up so high and mighty. I have mixed feelings about Jeor Mormont. Overall, a good person, but I do side with Jon Snow that his acceptance of Craster does not sit right with me. Did he deserve the mutiny? No. Are those who mutinied against him wrong and evil? Yes. Jon’s friends are good lads. Samwell Tarly just proves that when you into danger, take a Sam with you. And further proof that book knowledge is just as important as brawling. Jon’s a good enough man that he recognizes that. And Sam’s adorable with Gilly and the baby. A wee bit dense at times, but he’s a man. I wanted Olly to work out, but I could see he wasn’t able to see the whole picture when Jon brought the Wildlings south. And it was a jab in my heart when he dealt the killing blow in the mutiny. Disliked Thorne from the start. Now, he was a well rounded character. A mean man, but he understood duty. He stood aside and let the lads take Slynt when the other stood against the rightfully elected Lord Commander Snow. He had grudging respect for Jon once the younger man proved himself. He took good command during the attack on Castle Black. He honestly felt he was right to mutiny; my argument compared to his is that, if you felt he did what he thought was right, why did you kill him?

I respect Mance Rayder. I understand why he didn’t kneel, but I don’t agree with it; I side with Jon. Again, Jon was an honorable man to save Mance the agony of being burned tormund and snowalive. Tormund is hilarious; I love him and love the relationship he developed with Jon. He glomped Jon and interrupted his reunion with Edd. And his comment to Edd “I’ve always had blue eyes!” made me chuckle in the middle of a tense moment. And I adore the scene after the Battle of Winterfell during the feast between Tormund and Jon, toasting and cheering. Even before Jon returned to Castle Black, Tormund cared about the little crow and tried to keep him alive. Ygritte was awesome! Well rounded character, badass, but her intimate scenes with Jon Snow made me all squishy inside. I ship her with Jon Snow more than anyone else. (And I think it’s adorable that the two actors married each other!)

King’s Landing crew: Renly should not have made a big for kingship, he was not suited for it. I couldn’t decide for several seasons if I trusted Lord Varys, but I ultimately believed him when he said he fought for the realm, for the little people. Grand Maester Pycelle was creepy. And you could tell he was in the pockets of the Lannisters. Qyburn was also creepy. Quite honestly, I fast forwarded through some of his scenes because I could tell I did not want to watch. Littlefinger was a manipulative bastard; I kept hoping he would die. He did finally get his just deserts.

The Lannisters: There are times I almost respect Tywin. He was a reasonable master to Arya when she was at Casterly Rock. He treated all of his children horribly, though. But was determined to bring Joffrey into line. Tyrion is the kindest of the bunch, has some snappy one-liners (he’s my friend’s favorite character). He was genuinely kind to Sansa, even before they were married and was a friend to Jon. He did make mistakes, but he was honest about them. I respected Cersei more at the beginning of the show; I could see she was politically astute. There is something about the way her face looks and way she speaks at time that she reminds me of Keira Knightley in Pirates of the Caribbean. But then power made her crazy. I wanted to hate Jamie; he pushed a boy out of a window in the first episode! Then he had character development once he teamed up with Brienne of Tarth (and lost the look of Prince Charming from Shrek). And I would feel sorry for him. Then he’d do something that reminded me he could be a horrible person. Bronn was good when he was with Tyrion, but I always knew he was mainly in it for the money. Pod was kind of adorable; a decent character who got back up every time someone shot him down (mainly Brienne, but she came around in the end). Once Brienne loosened up, I got to like her better. The narrow worldview of “duty and honor” can be a bit off-putting. And Tormund’s crush was hilarious. I’m glad she hooked up with Jamie. And the duel between her and Arya was awesome!

The Tyrells: Mace is a simpleton. Loras was kind and honestly would have made a decent husband to Sansa. I liked Margaery, at least until the whole fiasco with the Religion of the Seven. She came back for a glorious moment. She and Olenna were kind to Sansa and were a good way for her to get out of King’s Landing; pity it didn’t work out. Olenna was sassy and savvy. And their sigil looks a dead ringer for the Tudor rose (which I find a wee bit ironic since the actress who plays Margaery portrayed Anne Bolyen in The Tudors).

The Greyjoys: The father was cruel. I got to like Yara as time went on. I initially didn’t trust Theon, he was kind of mean from the get go and could kind of tell he was out for himself. Then he betrayed the Starks and I wanted him dead. Then he was tortured (again, I honestly fast forwarded through a lot of that because “nope, don’t need to sit through that bit”) and yeah, at the very beginning, he kind of deserved it. Then it went too far. And I pitied him by the time Sansa returned to Winterfell and was genuinely sad when he died. That is a pairing that could have worked out.

Targaryen supporters: I have the unpopular view that I am not fond of Daenerys. She wasn’t as outright insane as her brother, but certainly by the end. She started out as a reasonably moral character. She found some happiness with Khal Drogo (I liked it when he supported her bid for the throne and they would call each other moon and stars. I was sad to see him die, particularly so early in the series). But when she started to use violence or threaten it to get her way, that’s when I saw her true character come out. And I strongly dislike her insistence that Jon Snow kneel to her and be demoted from King of the North. I do like Ser Jorah Mormont (it took me a little bit to realize the connection between him and the Lord Commander of the Night’s Watch). He’s got a good head on his shoulder and really, Daenerys shouldn’t have been so black-and-white about his original spying on her; it was before he got to know her and fall in love. If he had been around more at crucial points, she might not have made some of the mistakes that she had.

My favorite house is Stark. They’re noble and good; but human, they make mistakes. Not the most fond of Catelyn, mainly for her treatment of Jon. I don’t think she should have left Winterfell. She jumped into action without thinking of what to do down the road. Aye, it was nice for her to join up with Robb, but her youngest two needed her more. Poor Rickon, there’s not much of a chance to get an opinion on him. He was loyal to Bran and ultimately died a horrible death, within a hand’s reach of hope. Bran was cute when he was younger; I don’t like him as the “Three-Eyed Raven.” Too emotionless. I pity Sansa when she’s held prisoner in King’s Landing and her marriage to Ramsay Bolton is a toss up to whether it was worse than marriage to Joffrey would have been. She learned to play the game and so I can’t trust her fully. Arya is badass, which is cool, but she went through so much. Here is where I would say, you can make someone badass without doing all that (though I may not be entirely innocent in what I’ve put characters through in my stories). So I can’t trust her fully either, not a trained assassin. And I think she should have stuck around at the end. I respect Eddard, though as stated previously, he didn’t play the game well. He was trying to be honorable in a dishonest place. For all that King’s Landing will spout their admiration of honor, it’s full of cutthroats. He raised his children well; they remember his teachings long after he’s gone. I genuinely like Robb. Again, he made mistakes. But I put more of the blame of the Red Wedding on the Lannisters and Freys. Aye, he gave his word, but he fell in love. He made the decisions he thought were right.

It’s probably not a surprise that my favorite character is Jon Snow. He lives by Ned Stark’s example, always trying to do the honorable thing. He spends time amongst the Free Folk and realizes they’re no different and ultimately befriends them. He is born for leadership, but is smart enough to not want command or the crown, but he’ll do his duty and he’ll do it well. I did not like his relationship with Daenerys. On the one hand, glad he’s happy, on the other hand, I don’t trust her. She barely listened to him and he has to trail along picking up the pieces.

Let’s play a game: Hey, It’s That Guy! Game of Thrones is filled with actors that I have seen elsewhere.

Karl Tanner (the Night’s Watchman that betrays Joer Mormont) is played by Burn Gorman who played Owen Harper in Torchwood; he wasn’t a terribly kind character in that show either.

Orell, the warg of Tormund’s Wildlings is played by Mackenzie Crook, Mr. Ragetti from Pirates of the Caribbean.

The High Sparrow is also familiar from Pirates of the Caribbean, Governor Swann, played by Jonathan Pryce. Pryce also plays the villain in Tomorrow Never Dies.

Osha, the Wildling woman who protected Rickon and Bran, is played by Natalie Tena, Nymphadora Tonks from Harry Potter

Other Harry Potter cast mates include David Bradley who plays Walder Frey here, was Argus Filch in Harry Potter. Knew we shouldn’t have trusted him.

Michelle Fairley, who plays Catelyn Stark, briefly appears as Mrs. Granger in the first part of Deathly Hallows.

Archmaester Ebrose is played by Jim Broadbent, who in addition to being Professr Slughorn in Half-Blood Prince and Deathly Hallows, was Professor Diggory Kirke in The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. He’s also appeared in Kingdom of the Crystal Skull and Moulin Rouge.

Of course, we recognize Jason Momoa now from Aquaman and Justice League, who played Khal Drogo

Edmure Tully, the bit dim brother of Catelyn Stark nee Tully is played by Tobias Menzies, who plays a double role of Frank Randall and Black Jack Randall in Outlander, and it looks like Philip, Duke of Edinburgh on The Crown.

Jojen Reed is played by Thomas Brodie-Sangster, who we’ve seen as young Tristan in Tristan and Isolde, Romulus Augustus in Last Legion, and he too was part of Doctor Who.

Incidentally, he’s in the same episode as Harry Lloyd, who plays Viserys Targaryen. Lloyd was also Will Scarlett in BBC’s Robin Hood series.

Let’s not forget “Holy crow, it’s Mycroft!”  Yep, Sherlock‘s Mark Gatiss (both a creator and actor of the show) pops up every once in a while as a member of the Iron Bank.  Mark Gatiss is also in the recent Disney film Christopher Robin and acts very Mycroft-like (as in, no fun).

Davos Seaworth, probably the most sane man in the bunch, is played by Liam Cunningham. As many others in the cast, he’s been in BBC productions including Merlin and Doctor Who. He was Agravaine in First Knight and was in 1995’s version of A Little Princess.

King Beyond the Wall, Mance Rayder, is played by Ciarán Hinds. He does play Albus’s brother Aberforth Dumbledore in Deathly Hallows, but I know him more from Phantom of the Opera and Amazing Grace.

Margarey Tyrell, who marries both Joffrey (extremely briefly) and Tommen is played by Natalie Dormer and played another famous queen, Anne Boleyn in The Tudors (also had gratuitous sex, though not as much violence). She did appear briefly in Captain America: First Avenger.

Her father, Mace Tyrell, is played by Roger Ashton-Griffiths, who was Friar Tuck in Princess of Thieves amongst other roles.

Stannis Baratheon’s wife, Selyse is played by Tara Fitzgerald, who portrayed Marie de Medici (Louis’s mother) in BBC’s Musketeers; not a warm-hearted woman there either.

Also jumping over from Musketeers is Alexandra Downing, who briefly plays Edmure Tully’s Frey wife, but shined as Anne of Austria in the swashbuckling series.

Famous name Clive Russell is Blackfish Tully, Catelyn’s uncle.

Another famous name is Julian Glover, who plays Grand Maester Pycelle.

King Robert Baratheon is played by Mark Addy; he was Roland in A Knight’s Tale and Friar Tuck in Russell Crowe’s Robin Hood.

Also from Robin Hood is Max von Sydow who was Walter Loxley there and plays the Three-Eyed Raven here. He has credits going back to the fifties.

Sassy Olenna Tyrell is played by Diana Rigg, who has a credits’ list going back to the sixties, but most recently has appeared in Victoria and a small part in Doctor Who (her character in that was very creepy; I prefer her as Olenna).

Charles Dance, who played head of the Lannister House, Tywin, appeared in BBC’s Merlin as the Witchfinder. Not a likeable character and bound and determined to ruin people’s lives.

Donald Sumpter, Maester Luwin of Winterfell had a small role of the Fisher King in Merlin as well.

Joe Dempsie, who plays Gendry, was also in Merlin, as Merlin’s best hometown friend, and he was also in Doctor Who.

Tom Hopper, the second version of Dickon Tarly, is Sir Percival from Merlin.

Ygritte was played by Rose Leslie, who appeared as Gwen Dawson, a servant in the first season of Downton Abbey.

Jorah Mormont is played by Iain Glen, who also appeared in Downton Abbey, but a season after Rose, as Sir Richard Carlisle, a potential suitor for Mary. He also was in Doctor Who as Octavian, fighting against the angels, and appeared in The Last Legion and Kingdom of Heaven.

His father, Jeor Mormont, Lord Commander of the Night Watch, is played by James Cosmo. He’s very kindly as Father Christmas in The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe. He’s been in other historical action films like Troy, The Last Legion, and Braveheart. (He was in Highlander, but I cut out on that movie twenty minutes in) and appeared in Castle, Merlin, and a version of Ivanhoe.

Ser Alliser Thorne (pain in the ass Night Watch Commander) is portrayed by Owen Teale, who has several credits to his name. He’s recently been in the biopic Tolkien (I highly recommend), appeared in Last Legion, King Arthur, and Torchwood.

Sansa Stark is played by Sophie Turner who is now the younger Jean Grey/Phoenix in the newer X-Men films (she does not appear in the same segment as Peter Dinklage; they missed each other by a movie).

Tyrion Lannaster is famously played by Peter Dinklage who has appeared in the Avengers and X-Men franchises, and plays the no less sarcastic dwarf Trumpkin in Prince Caspian.

Noble Robb Stark is played by Richard Madden, who recently appeared in Rocketman (another movie I recommend), though sadly Richard Madden’s character turned out to be not nice, so I put on Disney’s live action Cinderella (he’s Prince Kit, which now makes me chuckle), so I could see him be a good guy.

The only other credit I know Kit Harington, the brooding Jon Snow, from is voicing Eret, son of Eret in the latter two How to Train Your Dragon movies. I am interested in checking out some of his other credits.

And if you lot don’t know Sean Bean, as honorable Ned Stark…He’s Boromir from Lord of the Rings, Zeus in Percy Jackson, Odysseus in Troy, stars as Sharpe in that collection of films, the antagonist in the first National Treasure, the villain in GoldenEye opposite Pierce Brosnan (one of my favorite Bond films, and I think the first one my parents got me to watch) and the villain in Patriot Games opposite Harrison Ford (my favorite Jack Ryan movie; I should read that book sometime).

 

I would love to hear your thoughts on the show. Considering I am re-watching it and want the series on DVD, I believe it is safe to say I enjoyed it. What’s your favorite season? Episode? House? Character?

My plan is to finish up Merlin, then take another (hopefully) brief hiatus to work on some other writing, though if I manage to balance well, mayhap I will post some movie reviews at the same time.

“Now, that’s the way to make an entrance”

Season One

We have finally arrived to the show I’ve been looking forward to re-watching for weeks, biding my time! It’s more historically accurate than some other shows *coughRobinHoodcough* but there are times they take some liberties. It’s the entertainment business, gotta let it slide. I adore the characterization in this production; gives the fanwriters lots of brotherly love moments to play with. The action is superb, the costumes are grand (properly worn in leather, which may not be completely period accurate, but it looks cool).

The show ran for three seasons, only ten episodes each season, since it ran in the summer, between the main programs. Aramis’s Santiago Cabrera was previously in BBC’s Merlin series as Lancelot (we’ll be getting to that series shortly), and Alexandra Dowling, who plays Queen Anne, was also in one episode of Merlin. Ryan Gage plays King Louis, though he’ll show up later as Alfrid in the Hobbit trilogy. The first season features Peter Capaldi as Cardinal Richelieu; Capaldi would go on to be the Twelfth Doctor in Doctor Who.

The series is set in Paris, 1630. We’re first introduced in Friends and Enemies to Alexandre D’Artagnan and his son, Charles when they stop at an inn on their way to Paris. Masked riders stop as well and end up killing Alexandre while Charles was taking care of the horses. Charles gets the name “Athos” from his dying father and sets out on revenge. Meanwhile, in Paris, each Musketeer starts their day. One man (Athos) has bottles strewn across his floor and uses a bucket of water, covered in ice, to dunk his head into in order to properly wake up. Another (Porthos) is playing cards against a Red Guard. They get into a duel and Porthos mockingly defends himself with a fork. And another man (Aramis) is in bed with a beautiful woman. Turns out, she’s the mistress of Cardinal Richelieu (this Cardinal doesn’t really claim to be pious). Richelieu returns early and so Aramis must jump out the window to escape. Adelle kicks his pistol under her bed for the time being. Aramis lands in front of his friends and they report to Captain Treville at the musketeers’ garrison. He has a new mission for them, another regiment of musketeers have gone missing. However, it’s much more than that when the Cardinal and the king get involved. King Louis had sent letters with the musketeers of sensitive nature to the Spanish. And now, the Spanish envoy is missing.

Catching up with D’Artagnan, he has stopped at a lodging house where he meets a beautiful dark-haired woman, and her pompous male accompaniment. The woman joins D’Artagnan in bed, where he discovers scars on her neck. The cocky young man offers to kill the man who caused them. Come morning, the lady is gone, though there is a bloody knife left in the pillow. When D’Artagnan investigates a scream, the man from the previous night is found dead. Bloody knife in his hand, everyone blames D’Artagnan and he has to jump out a window in order to escape (must be a trend amongst musketeers). He runs through a market and comes across a young woman, whom he asks to kiss him as a diversion. She takes offense afterwards and sends him on his way. He passes out at her feet. Next, he wakes with her over him. She had taken him back to her home. D’Artagnan thanks her for her assistance, but he must find Athos. She is familiar with the musketeer and introduces herself as Madame Bonacieux – Constance.

dart duel athos

The three musketeers are at the garrison when D’Artagnan strides in, loudly challenging Athos to a duel. He doesn’t listen when Athos insists he did not murder the boy’s father. Young D’Artagnan holds his own well against Athos. The duel pauses, but he starts again against all three, until Constance calls a halt. Treville next arrives with guards for Athos’s arrest. Even at the trial, Athos insists he is innocent; he did not murder anyone at an inn, nor did he attack a carriage. But the witnesses have his name. Louis, at Richelieu’s urging, makes an example of Athos and orders his execution. Aramis and Porthos pick up D’Artagnan to help clear Athos’s name, and to find proper justice for Alexandre D’Artagnan.

For brevity’s sake – they do solve the case. We find out that Milady, the woman from the inn, was the one who killed the man, apparently the Spanish envoy. She has Louis’s letters and reports to Richelieu. Louis demonstrates how desperate he is for the Cardinal’s advice, agreeing to disband the Musketeers if it will make the older man happy (that does not happen…yet). The true culprit? A band of Richelieu’s guards who went a bit too far. The musketeers, including D’Artagnan attack and D’Artagnan faces the man. At Aramis’s call, he does stop from killing the man, but when a knife is pulled, he acts defensively and stabs the man. All three arrive at the prison in order to stop Athos’s execution. Richelieu takes Adelle to the country; Milady had discovered that the pistol in her room belonged to Aramis, so he has her shot with the pistol, while she screams “I love Aramis” until the end.

D’Artagnan’s next adventure, Sleight of Hand has him going undercover to prison in order to discover a suspected terrorist’s plan. By this point, Athos has started to take an interest in D’Artagnan; he argues against sending the boy in, not because he doubts his skills, but because he doesn’t want the young man to die. Constance Bonacieux has also become fond of the young Gascon. When she visits the garrison with her husband, she confronts the three older musketeers and slaps Aramis for betraying their friend. Aramis is fine with the young woman slapping him. They get a chance to see their friend when they accompany to queen to pardon a few prisoners. Vadim, the terrorist, uses the queen’s visit in order to escape, taking her hostage for a moment. D’Artagnan accompanies him and does talk the other man out of killing the queen. During the ensuing firefight, Aramis covers the queen from bullet fire. Queen Anne is deeply impressed with the musketeer’s bravery and rewards him later by gifting a jeweled cross of hers to Aramis.

Vadim, however knows that D’Artagnan is in league with the musketeers. He ties the boy to kegs of gunpowder in tunnels beneath the palace. Our hero has fifteen minutes to get free. He just scrapes by, but when he goes to leave the room, the door ignites other lines. He gets a bit of distance between him and the blast, but is still thrown off his feet, as are the other musketeers. (After Aramis recklessly jumps on a grenade in order to save the queen; he’s lucky it was a dud). D’Artagnan confronts Vadim and mortally wounds him. We also start seeing a connection between Milady and blue forget-me-nots.

Commodities brings Athos’s past to light. It starts with the musketeers having to escort a trader, Emile Bonaire to the king; Spain claims he is violating their trade agreement with France. Emile is the first to call attention to Porthos being black (this is an homage to Alexandre Dumas’s father being a half-black Frenchman). Porthos admits that his mother was a slave who died when he was five. The musketeers are ambushed and Porthos suffers a deep wound from an axe. At first, Athos wants to ride on, but Aramis (the medic of the group) angrily states that Porthos will not survive that long; he needs stitching which cannot be done in their present position. Athos eventually admits he knows a place. They ride to an estate, Athos begins opening doors and shutters. When D’Artagnan inquires how Athos knew of the place, the older man confesses that he owns it. He was once the Comte de la Fere, nobility.

Porthos, after being expertly stitched by Aramis’s fine needlework, discovers that Emile is more than a simple trader. He is a slaver. The cheap labor he brags about in the colonies are slaves. Emile tries to argue that it’s simply business. Athos regrettably has to point out that while slaving is disgusting, it is not a crime.

Poor Athos (this is why he is a favorite character, a wooby that we want to hug and put to rights) is haunted by memories of the house and his former life. He had a younger brother, Thomas, who died, and was apparently the family favorite. He cries at his old bed, wine spreading on the cover. He later throws a wine bottle at his portrait. He remembers his wife pressing forget-me-nots into a locket. Yes, his wife is Milady (whom we know is still alive). He sends the rest of his companions on to Paris. Athos falls asleep, then wakes to smoke, discovering a fire set in his old bedroom. He turns and Milady is standing there with a torch. She’s surprised to see him there and he’s looking at a ghost. She hits him with the torch; she’s there to erase the past, destroy it completely. She’s more than willing to kill Athos. Athos brings up that she murdered his brother. Her retort is that she did it to save her love with Athos; Thomas was a fool and a hypocrite; he deserved to die. Athos begs for Milady to kill him. But she finds that he still wears the locket she gave him. D’Artagnan (having disobeyed orders) has returned and calls for Athos. Milady flees and D’Artagnan races in to save his friend. Athos brokenly divulges that he had had his wife taken from the house and hanged. But she’s not really dead.

“It was my duty! It was my duty to uphold the law, my duty to condemn the woman I love to death. I clung to the belief that I had no choice. Five years learning to live in a world without her.”

The episode ends with Bonaire and the Cardinal becoming business partners, but the musketeers get the last laugh. They set Bonaire up to be trapped by the Spanish.

The Good Solider exposes a secret of Aramis’s past. As assassin breaks up a meeting between the king and the Duke of Savoy (who is married to Louis’s sister). Louis and Richelieu are trying to persuade Savoy to sign a peace treaty with France. Hints are dropped about a massacre in Savory five years prior, of which Aramis is a survivor. Aramis discovers the would-be assassin to be his old friend Marsac. Marsac was a musketeer alongside Aramis, until he deserted after the massacre at Savoy. Marsac claims he knows the truth and blames Captain Treville. Aramis’s friends don’t believe Marsac, but for Aramis’s sake, investigate the claims. In the meantime, they hide Marsac at Bonacieux’s. Constance is not pleased to discover that she was harboring a criminal, angrily telling D’Artagnan to leave. Later, D’Artagnan promises to never lie again. Constance doesn’t want protection, she wants to be treated like an equal. When Marsac goes after Constance, D’Artagnan punches him. He once again apologizes to Constance. In return, she wants something that her husband can never find out about: she wants D’Artagnan to teach her to shoot, and sword fight, complaining “why do men have all the fun?” (this is why we like Constance)

constance shoot

The four confront Treville, but he will not admit anything. He has several angry discussions with the Cardinal, one of which Aramis overhears. Treville does not out his man to Richelieu and wearily admits to Aramis that he did hand over the musketeers’ orders, but knew nothing about a massacre until afterwards. Aramis is furious, punching his commanding officer and threatening to go to the authorities. When Marsac finds out, he punches Aramis and leaves with the intention to kill Treville. Aramis catches up to him and tries to talk his old friend down, but when Marsac starts firing, Aramis has to fire back. He hits his friend. “Better to die a Musketeer than live like a god,” Marsac states with his last breath. Treville and Aramis bury their comrade at the end of the episode.

The Duke is trying to discover whether France has been hiding his old councilor for the past five years. He thinks he has evidence, but when he goes to visit the prison, the musketeers have arrived first and switched prisoners. Humiliated, the Duke is forced to sign the peace treaty. As Treville admitted to Aramis and Marsac, the massacre was ultimately on the king’s orders; protecting their most important spy in Savoy, his sister. The Duke’s councilor, a Spanish loyalist, began to suspect her, so the musketeers were used to make the Duke believe there was an assassination attempt while the councilor was abducted. Louis even hints to Anne that there may always be an accident that kills the older Duke, putting his son in charge (and more liable to be sympathetic to French influence).

We discover more of Porthos’s background in The Homecoming. In the aftermath of his birthday celebration, where he shoots a melon off Aramis’s head, while drunk, Porthos wakes in the street, next to a body, with no memory of what happened. Red Guards assume he is the culprit and arrest him. The judge shows no leniency, calling Porthos a mongrel and orders him executed. He’s rescued, but not by the musketeers. Masked men take him to the Court of Miracles (it was brought up in Disney’s Hunchback of Notre Dame). Turns out, Porthos grew up in the Court. His old friend, Charon is king now. And his old friend, Flea is still there and now hooked up with Charon. (That doesn’t stop her from sleeping with Porthos; those two had been an item, but she won’t leave the Court).

The other musketeers investigate the young man’s death, connecting it with a plot to destroy the Court. The boy’s father was intent on regaining the wealth of the family, bought the land and with the denizens gone, would be able to collect rent once new houses had been built. And, Charon was his inside man, arranging powder kegs and allowing outsiders, disguised, to enter and blow the place up. (The man signs a confession, then shoots himself rather than be arrested.) Porthos eventually recalls the evening’s events and Charon’s part and confronts his friend. Flea takes a bullet to the shoulder for protecting Porthos, and Porthos and Charon fight. Aramis, Athos, and D’Artagnan have come to their friend’s rescue and Aramis ends up stabbing Charon when he tries to stab Porthos in the back. While Porthos misses Flea, he is happier as a Musketeer and has a new family.

In The Exiles, we once again hit upon the idea of King Louis having a secret twin. As Father Duval [who is played by the real life father of Tom Burke, who plays Athos] tells Cardinal Richelieu, Marie de Medici (yes, from the House of de Medici) had gone into labor before being able to return to Paris. A secret son was born before the rest of the council arrived; the boy was deformed and so whisked away when it was apparent a sibling was arriving. Philippe went on to live a quiet life, cared for by Father Duval. A young nurse was hired and she eventually fell in love with Philippe. They married and had a child. When they went walking about as a family, the villagers beat Philippe to death for his deformity. All the musketeers know is that Aramis and D’Artagnan were ordered to retrieve the mother and child and deliver them to Richelieu. But another group of men kidnap the baby.

Marie de Medici presents herself to her son, despite having been ordered to stay away after a coup she had set up to overthrow him (not quite what happened historically, but French history is not my strong suit). Louis can’t decide how to handle affairs. “Decapitating one’s mother is rarely popular with the people, sire, it always looks a touch ungrateful,” Richelieu informs Louis. She is sent away with a musketeer escort and then ambushed. This brings her to the palace (she has an unusual fashion style, for the period. I’ve noticed the heroes tend to be more accurate while the villains have a bit of a modern flair).

Aramis and D’Artagnan manage to locate the infant and D’Artagnan has the brilliant idea to send Constance in as a nurse maid, and get them information. They’re surprised when Marie de Medici shows up and Agnes, Philippe’s wife, informs them that she is Philippe’s mother. Constance keeps her cool until Marie leaves. The musketeers then sweep in, though Constance holds her own with a sword against one of the guards, to Aramis’s surprise. Treville still orders that Agnes and her baby, Henri must be taken to the Cardinal, though he states he will conveniently be busy with paperwork for a time. Aramis whisks Agnes and Henri away, intent on getting them to Spain. His friends follow him, Athos snarking about keeping the plan suicidal. They throw barrels of fine brandy into a fire to provide a distraction from Marie’s guards. Aramis takes a bundle across the bridge, but drops it in the water.

Richelieu informs Marie that her plans have failed. She will not be able to overthrow Louis and put Henri on the throne, thus ensuring another regency for her. She walks away with tears, though I’m not sure if she’s more upset about her plans falling apart or the loss of her grandson. The Cardinal kills Father Duvall and destroys the documents so there can be no further questions of Louis’s legitimacy.

Never fear, the episode ends happy; the bundle had not really been Henri. The musketeers and Constance meet Agnes and reunite mother and son. Aramis insists they leave France (funny enough, there is a sign to Avalon in the background of the shot), there are too many threats to the small family.

Early feminism gets a voice in The Rebellious Woman. The name Comtess Ninon de la Roque is brought up when a young woman is killed by the royal carriage, attempting to deliver a petition to the queen. Ninon educates women of all stations, teaching them scholarly pursuits, in the face of men saying it was a danger to fragile female minds. The Cardinal orders Milady to find evidence against Ninon, suggesting that Ninon’s interests in girls is not entirely wholesome. “How like a man,” Milady retorts (okay, I’ll cheer for her for that bit). The Cardinal wants her money to fund the country.

The musketeers visit Ninon and she’s attracted to Athos; there’s a battle of wits and he persuades her to allow a search of her rooms. The missing girl is not found, but Athos agrees to dinner with the woman. Neither of them are interested in marriage; Ninon will not be bound to a man, and Athos is opposed to the idea after the disastrous results of Milady. Their pleasant evening is interrupted when Aramis declares trouble at Ninon’s; the Red Guard are ransacking her library and have found several missing girls in a hidden room.

At the same time, Father Luca Sustini [the actor was also in BBC’s Merlin, there is a joke filtering about the various fandoms that BBC reuses actors and sets] has arrived to visit Richelieu from Rome. He gifts the Cardinal with a saint bone and informs his colleague that there is talk of who the next Pope may be; there are those who would support Richelieu’s bid for the position. When the subject of Ninon arises, Sustini declares her a witch for her progressive ideas and poisoning the minds of other girls. He urges Richelieu to be decisive; Rome will be watching with great interest.

Milady speaks out against Ninon at her trial, lying. Athos is furious; loudly declaring that she cannot be trusted. The court finds Ninon guilty and orders to be executed. The queen arrives with word from the king that Ninon will not be killed; unless she confesses by her own hand. Yet when Richelieu falls ill during the proceedings right after Ninon declares she’s looking at the Devil when she looks at him, Sustini loudly proclaims her a witch. Aramis rushes to save the Cardinal’s life. Milady continues with the plan, blackmailing Ninon that her friends will suffer the same fate unless Ninon confesses.

Preparations are made for a pyre while the musketeers search for the true culprit of the Cardinal’s poisoning. They trace it back to Sustini and arrive back at the monastery in time to save the Cardinal from being stabbed. Richelieu suspected it was Sustini, it’s an old papal trick to poison relics. He much rather keep his position and influence in France than become Pope. His vision is clearer now; no person, no nation, no god, will stand in his way. With his brush with death, he’s less liable to send someone else to theirs. Athos frees Ninon, but the woman must leave Paris. Her wealth will be taken by the crown, but she will receive a small stipend to live on. The Comtess de la Roque is officially dead. Ninon will still promote female education, but far from the Cardinal’s ear. Athos and Ninon share a tender moment, Ninon urging Athos to be careful of the dark-haired woman; she has the Cardinal’s protection. She could have loved a man like Athos, pity they’re neither the marrying kind. And the episode ends with a tender moment between D’Artagnan and Constance, admitting their love and kissing…and leading to other activities.

I enjoy the ending of The Challenge; it goes back to the simple dichotomy of Red Guards vs. Musketeers. After the musketeers escort a dangerous criminal back to Paris for the Red Guards to claim, LaBarge (played by Vinnie Jones, whose credits include King Gareth in Galavant, the bad guy in the first episode of rebooted MacGyver, and the Juggernaut in X-Men) kills the captain of the Red Guards. Richelieu and Treville start arguing over which is the better regiment in front of the king; Louis takes their wager and sets up a challenge; the winner will definitively prove which group is superior.

Treville announces to his musketeers there is a 30 livre entry fee, to create a winner’s purse (and cover the wagered amount). Aramis and Porthos must find patronesses. D’Artagnan hasn’t been receiving funds from his farm and turns out, it was one of the ones destroyed when LaBarge was working as a cruel tax collector in Gascony. Constance tries to help, but D’Artagnan eventually receives the needed money from Milady. She’s trying to play an angle with the Cardinal, claiming that D’Artagnan is a key in destroying the musketeers.

Richelieu begins stacking the deck in his favor. He has Bonacieux spy on D’Artagnan. Bonacieux catches the young Gascon in an affair with his wife and threatens Constance with D’Artagnan’s death if she doesn’t break it off with the boy. Constance does as she’s commanded and utterly breaks D’Artagnan’s heart; and her own. She silently sobs after D’Artagnan leaves, her husband watching in the next room. Richelieu also commissions LaBarge as the new captain of his guards, guaranteeing the musketeer champion will lose. Treville finds out what Richelieu is up to and declares himself the champion for the musketeers. Athos is furious on D’Artagnan’s behalf; the lad has it in him to become the greatest musketeer and Treville just took his best chance of being noticed by the king and winning a commission.

The day of the contest, when LaBarge steps out, the musketeers realize what Treville had done. The fight between LaBarge and Treville is intense; Treville lands a hit. LaBarge retaliates by stepping on Treville’s shoulder. Treville’s musketeers loyally come to his defense and a short fight breaks out between them and the guards. The king calls a halt. He will allow Treville to choose another champion since LaBarge broke the rules. Treville names D’Artagnan. Heeding Athos’s lessons of keeping a level head, D’Artagnan faces LaBarge. D’Artagnan fights with a ferocity and ultimately defeats the large man. Louis orders him to kneel and commissions him into his musketeers; his friends give him his own pauldron (it’s what they use as uniforms instead of blue tunics, though blue capes are a part of the uniform). D’Artagnan doesn’t get the purse; the king declares that the wagered money will go to the treasury since the rules were in fact broken.

D’Artagnan’s first mission as a full musketeer is to guard the queen as she bathes in a lake known to increase fertility in Knight Takes Queen. While Anne is away, Louis flirts with visiting Charlotte Melandorff. She comes with a large dowry (which would help the treasury) and her sisters have bore sons to their own husbands. Louis whines to Richelieu that he wishes Anne was dead, so he could marry Charlotte; it would be better for France. Anne must be barren since there have never been any children. Thus, the musketeers’ quiet mission becomes a lot more interesting. One of Anne’s maids is killed while borrowing her robe. She is spirited away by the musketeers, a whole troop of men on their tail. Porthos and D’Artagnan are ordered by Athos to return to Paris for reinforcements; Athos and Aramis will take the queen to the safety of a nearby convent.

Adding intrigue, one of the sisters knows Aramis. She was his intended from years pervious; he had gotten her pregnant and he was due to marry her. But the babe was lost and she left him, entering the convent. When she reveals herself to Aramis, she claims that she did it as a favor for Aramis; they would have never been a good match, she felt. By entering the convent, she allowed him a life of adventure and freedom. Sadly, the young woman is killed when two of the mercenaries (who, for some reason are Irish. Not sure I quite understand why they had to be Irish) enter the convent. Anne, already attracted to Aramis, comforts him in his grief, in her bed. Mother Superior is awesome really; ready to help defend her convent, loading pistols for Athos while he and Aramis keep the mercenaries at bay. Aramis’s parents at one time wanted him to become a priest; he found he was better at dispatching people to hell.

Unfortunately, when Porthos and D’Artagnan arrive at the garrison, the rest of the musketeers are away on a hunt with the king and his guests. They are left with an injured Treville, the young stable boy, an old solider with one eye, and the cook. Richelieu is furious at Milady when he discovers that the man she hired to kill the queen did not succeed. He orders her to fix her mistake. She manages to pin the crime on Charlotte’s father, with sketchy evidence. Porthos, D’Artagnan, and Treville take their misfits and manage to mount a rescue attempt, arriving just when Athos and Aramis are out of bullets. When searching the mercenaries’ things afterwards, they discover the mark of a woman who is in lead with the Cardinal; Milady’s blue forget-me-nots. They begin to suspect that the Cardinal was truly behind the attempt on the queen’s life. Louis is quite pleased when his wife returns (he really is childlike; siding with whoever can hold his attention).

The first season ends with Musketeers Don’t Die Easily. All the plots are coming to a head. athos and miladyAthos drunkenly confronts his wife, threatening to kill her. His friends stop him, D’Artagnan coming forward when Milady pleads for the young man to save her, like he promised. Athos shoots D’Artagnan – in the side. Milady tries to persuade D’Artagnan to leave the musketeers and join the Cardinal. Richelieu has charged Milady with silencing Athos and his friends for good. Treville shows up to tell D’Artagnan that Athos will not serve with the boy; Treville has chosen his best swordsman, D’Artagnan must leave. D’Artagnan promises Milady he will does as she asks; he will kill Athos.

When D’Artagnan arrives at the garrison, he joins Athos, Porthos, and Aramis in Treville’s office. Turns out, this is all a ploy to catch Milady. They plan out their next step, to “kill” Athos. They make sure Milady is watching and do it in public. Aramis and Porthos shout insults at D’Artagnan after they spill blood on Athos. D’Artagnan goes to Richelieu, telling him that Treville is in possession of evidence against the Cardinal for the attempt on Queen Anne’s life. Aramis and Porthos will trade the letter for D’Artagnan. Richelieu arranges the exchange. Porthos confronts Cardinal about the attempted murder. Richelieu admits “I alone can make the decisions no one else can stomach.” One woman’s death is worth sacrificing to prevent civil war when the king dies without an heir. Richelieu snatches the letter. It is blank. Anne appears, alongside Treville; they heard everything. Richelieu begs mercy; everything he has done has been in the best interest of France. Only because she believes he is true in that sentiment, does Anne spare Richelieu (I believe him as well; the only reason he went after Anne was because his king wished it. It suited his own purposes as well, but Richelieu is ultimately loyal to France, putting its best interests first. This is what makes him a more complex villain that other adaptations give him credit for). Queen Anne’s influence now though with the king is higher than ever.

Richelieu gives up Milady to the musketeers; she is of no further use to the Cardinal. But Milady has her own insurance for her plans; she arranges for Constance to be abducted. When the musketeers confront her, she tells them where to be to retrieve the young woman. It is undoubtedly a trap. But they prepare. As the bonus feature states, it is their finest hour. Gun shots, explosions, and sword fights, the four of them take on dozens of bandits. D’Artagnan ferociously takes on the man holding Constance. Constance try to flee, but is caught by Milady. The four stride over to her, knowing she won’t kill Constance despite her threat. Athos steps towards his wife and Constance breaks free, flinging herself into D’Artagnan’s arms. Athos faces his wife. She begs for death; but he cannot. He orders her out of Paris. He departs, dropping the locket.

All seems right, but a servant comes running to Constance that Monsieur Bonacieux has tried to kill himself. Constance cannot leave her husband now, so D’Artagnan’s heart is broken again. The Cardinal is called before the king and queen and a small audience. Louis had “never expected this, after so long.” Anne is pregnant. Athos and Aramis exchange a look. The Cardinal later oversees a tender moment between Aramis and Anne; the musketeer promises to look over her son.

Fraternity, brotherhood; a huge theme of these Musketeers. Fans have deemed them the “Inseparables,” it’s always those four going on the most dangerous missions, those four appearing before Richelieu or the royal couple (yes, as some fans have pointed out, a bit like the Golden Trio in Harry Potter, “why is it always you three?”). And I am a huge fan of brotherly love, that friends can choose each other as family [I could go into a whole Supernatural spiel, but I shan’t at this moment. Maybe later in ‘Random Fandom.’] At the end of this season, while the Musketeers do not have glory, or money, or love; they do have honor.

My impressions of these characters after one season; Treville is honorable. Louis is whiny. I like Anne, even though she slept with Aramis; she is a kind woman. It is plain that her marriage with Louis is strained; I feel she only wanted a little bit of love for once in her life. Aramis could have stopped her, but was not in a place emotionally to be able to do that. Porthos is the most loyal friend someone could ask for. D’Artagnan is working on curbing his recklessness, but he’s young. Athos will make sure he doesn’t get himself killed. Athos is a tragic character who wants to see justice done. And I can respect Richelieu as a villain.

Next Time: Season Two

Hesitant Reaction

I should be working on finishing season two of The Musketeers for the main part of my blog.  But since I mentioned seeing How to Train Your Dragon 3: The Hidden World in my first ‘Random Fandom Thoughts’ post, thought I’d organize a quick review of the new movie.  Probably goes without saying, but just in case: Here, there be spoilers!

I did see it opening day (not night, ’cause I work).  And I’ve seen it a second time since.  Yes, I love the movie, but I don’t think it quite lives up to the first two films, or Race to the Edge.  Grimmel is a flat villain.  His scorpion-like dragons are creepier.  Okay, he hunts Night Furies, which is bad.  But, Drago wanted to conqueror the world!  We never saw Trader Johan coming.  Viggo was complex.  Dagur got redeemed (yes, as it has been pointed out to me, a television series can develop characters better, but we’ve seen movies do better).

I was already sad, knowing that Hiccup and Toothless would have to be separated.  And I sobbed, both times, watching it.  It just…felt like it was missing something.  Astrid and Hiccup seemed to have taken a step back from the second movie.  Astrid is still supportive, which is completely awesome.  Again, I think it was missing something.  Haven’t quite figured out what yet.

One the other hand…the parts with little Hiccup were absolutely adorable!  And baby Night Furies…squee!  Really, the ending makes the whole thing better.

My disappointment may just stem from I had hoped Toothless and Hiccup would have found a way to stay together, forever.  I know that’s not what the writers had planned.  But fans change things 🙂

The soundtrack is good; I like Once There Were Dragons and Third Date.  Maybe not quite as much as the first two; those just blew me away.

 

Feel free to comment.  I’m sure I will do a more in-depth review later (at this point, I’m thinking like a year from now or something, lol)